Lesson Plan

Waves, Surf, Currents, and Sand:  The Equilibrium Defining the Barrier Islands

Three types of waves

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Grade Level:
Sixth Grade-Eighth Grade
Subject:
Climate Change, Conservation, Earth Science, Environment, Geography, Geology, Hydrology, Landscapes, Oceans, Wilderness
Duration:
45-50 minutes per class visit
Group Size:
Up to 24 (4-8 breakout groups)
Setting:
classroom
National/State Standards:
6.E.2.3 and 6.L.2.3
7.P.1.1, 7.P.1.3, 7.E.1.3, and 7.E.1.5
8.E.2.2 and 8.L.4.2

Overview

We will focus on the power of the ocean and how it alters and reshapes this dynamic place.  We will look at pictures of storm damage and discuss the issues associated with developing barrier islands.  Students will participate in an activity that demonstrates the force of water in the movement of sand. 

Objective(s)

The learner will be able to: 

  • Using Cape Lookout National Seashore as an example, describe the impact of water and wind and their roles in the balance/equilibrium between the sea and shore. 
  • Understand how waves and currents impact the distribution of sand forming and eroding beaches. 
  • Understand and describe the major ways humans disrupt the natural equilibrium between the sea and shore. 
  • Decide if human actions are beneficial or detrimental to this balance




Procedure

Pre-Site Visit Activities: TEACHER COMPLETED

Knowledge Assessment

The Perfect Storm
• Give each student a copy of "The Perfect Storm" Handout to read while others finish the Assessment
• Those who do not get a chance in class should finish reading this handout at home

Wind, Waves, Currents, and Beaches Activity
• Split the class into groups of two
• Give each student copies of "Wind, Waves, Currents, and Beaches

Activity" and "The Smart Student's Guide"
• Working together, the students should discuss the questions on the activity sheet and write down possible answers (some questions may have more than one answer)
• If time allows, lead a class discussion on the questions and their answers. If there is no time, have the students turn in their team work.

On-Site Visit Activities: RANGER COMPLETED

Day 1

Presentation of Economic Cost of Storms on NC's Developed and Undeveloped Barrier Islands

Discussion on the Power of Wind, Waves, and Surf

Day 2

Discussion of Beach Erosion and Deposition

Black and Tan Sands Activity

Post-Site Visit Activities: TEACHER COMPLETED

Knowledge Assessment

Ribbon of Sand: Cape Lookout National Seashore
• Have students complete the "Viewer's Guide" as they watch this 26-minute park film

Discussion Points
• Some people have mentioned "restoring" the islands of the Outer Banks. What do you think "restoring" these islands means?
o How could they be restored?
• Should the islands of the Outer Banks be restored?
• What problems might restoring them cause?
o How would people be impacted?
o How would the islands be impacted?
o How would the wildlife be impacted?
• What problems might NOT restoring them cause?
o How would people be impacted?
o How would the islands be impacted?
o How would the wildlife be impacted?

3 Reviews

  •  
    Review submitted on

    "Great lesson plan"

    Pros

    Great information. One does not often find information on barrier island dynamics that are appropriate for student use. Great tie in to the use of national seashores.

    None

    None

    Comments

    Glad to have improved lesson plans that are easy to use.

    Problem with this review? Report it
  •  
    Review submitted on

    "Great lesson plan"

    Pros

    Don't often find information on barrier island dynamics that are appropriate for student use. Great tie in to purpose of national seashores

    Comments

    Glad to have updated lesson plans that are easy to use

    Problem with this review? Report it
  •  
    Review submitted on

    "Great lesson plan"

    Pros

    Great information. One does not often find information on barrier island dynamics that are appropriate for student use. Great tie in to the use of national seashores.

    None

    None

    Comments

    Glad to have improved lesson plans that are easy to use.

    Problem with this review? Report it