• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

Donations

Would you like to support our park or a particular program, event, or project? Many people opt to make a difference by providing gifts to the parks. You can make direct cash or check gifts at the donation boxes located in each of the parks or you can mail your gift to the National Park Service. You can give a gift to a specific park: Fort Raleigh National Historic Site, Wright Brothers National Memorial, or Cape Hatteras National Seashore – or simply to the Outer Banks Group, which oversees all three.

If desired, when making a donation, you may specify a use such as:

  • education programming,
  • the lighthouse(s),
  • marine mammal strandings, or
  • Ocracoke pony herd

and the entire gift will be used solely for that purpose.

Your gift will be deposited in a government account; government accounts are non-interest bearing and cannot generate interest between the time it is deposited and the time it is spent. No administrative costs will be deducted from your gift.

Please include a short letter specifying the nature of your gift and, the purpose or project you intend the funds to benefit (or you may leave it up to our discretion). If you are making a donation in someone's honor, please include this information as well.

 

Donations made by check or money order should be made payable to "National Park Service" and sent to:

National Park Service,
Outer Banks Group,
1401 National Park Drive,
Manteo, NC 27954

Be it gift, volunteering, or teaching your children the value of our national parks, there are many ways to donate. Regardless of what form it takes, your donation is greatly appreciated!

Did You Know?

Seasparkle, a tiny dinoflagellate that can be seen glowing in the surfline at night.

The beaches along Cape Hatteras National Seashore sparkle at night. When you kick the sand, you disturb tiny dinoflagellates like seasparkle, magnified in the picture to the left. A chemical reaction causes them to glow with a blue-green light.