• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

Seashore Participates in Monofilament Recycling Stations

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Date: June 9, 2014
Contact: Outer Banks Group, 252-475-9034

A new partnership between Cape Hatteras National Seashore (Seashore) and Cape Lookout Studies was recently established with the installation of three monofilament recycling stations on Hatteras Island.In the Seashore, the three new recycling stations are located at Ramp 44 in Buxton, Ramp 55 in Hatteras, and the Frisco Bath House.

Utilizing volunteers, the Cape Lookout Studies organization promotes the Monofilament Recycling and Recovery Program and has placed over 45 recycling bins across the North Carolina coast.These monofilament recycling stations, found on many piers, boat ramps, docks and marinas, are pipe-shaped tubes with messages that convey the importance of keeping our waterways free of monofilament lines that inadvertently snare marine mammals and wildlife, including bottlenose dolphins, sea turtles, birds and fish.

To date, the organization has recycled over 1100 miles of discarded fishing line.The recycled fishing line is sent to Berkley Conservation Institute in Iowa where the discarded, potential environmental hazard, is turned into beneficial structures that promote fishing habitat called "fish-habs."

While traveling the beaches of the National Seashore, either by vehicle or foot, you can support this program!Collect discarded monofilament line and deposit it in one of the three new recycling stations in the park.

For more information and to see a photo of a monofilament recycling, check the following websites:

http://www.capelookoutstudies.org/monofilament-recycling-program

or

http://www.berkley-fishing.com/Recycling/Berkley-recycling,default,pg.html

Did You Know?

Giant Water Flea

This is not a space alien, even though it has a transparent body, wings, and a very large eye. Giant water fleas grow up to 2 cm long, and are a food source for small fish that shelter in the sound. You can swim with them in the sound-side waters off Cape Hatteras National Seashore.