• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

REVISED - Night Driving Routes Reopen September 16

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Date: September 17, 2013
Contact: Outer Banks Group, 252-475-9034

**Corrected Version**

Superintendent Barclay Trimble announced that on Monday, September 16 (at midnight) ORV routes reopened to night driving where no turtle nests remain or to the first posted closure in that route.The park's new ORV Management Plan states that from September 16 to November 15, night driving is allowed on ORV routes, or portions thereof, with no turtle nests remaining.A permit is required for any off-road vehicle use in Cape Hatteras National Seashore.

 

In 2013, 252 sea turtle nests have been identified on National Seashore beaches this season.Of this record breaking number, a total of approximately 118 remain in the ground. Visitors should note they will encounter sea turtle nest protection areas in effect parkwide.Closure conditions may change in the field on short notice and these posted protection areas are closed to all ORV, pedestrian and pet entry. On-site signage of a closed area will be clearly marked in the field with "symbolic fencing" consisting of wooden or carsonite posts, closure signs, string and black filter fencing.

As of September 17, 2013, ORV ramps/routes that are currently open for ORV nighttime driving are:

Hatteras Island:

Ramp 30

(**Note:Night driving restrictions do not apply to the Pole Road, Interdunal Road and Soundside access)

Ocracoke Island:

Ramp 59

Ramp 67

In addition, ORV ramps/routes that are currently open for ORV day use are:

Bodie Island:

  • North of Ramp 4

Hatteras Island:

  • North of Ramp 27
  • South of Ramp 30
  • South of Ramp 38
  • North & South of Ramp 43
  • North & South of Ramp 44
  • East & West of Ramp 49
  • Southwest of Ramp 55
  • Pole Road with pedestrian access to Hatteras Inlet

Ocracoke Island:

  • South of Ramp 59
  • North & South of Ramp 67
  • North & South of Ramp 70
  • North & South of Ramp 72

As a reminder, on November 1, 2013, the seasonally closed village beaches (Tri-villages of Rodanthe-Waves-Salvo, Avon, Frisco, Hatteras, and Ocracoke Day Use Area) will reopen to ORV use, except for sections of the beach with sea turtle nest protection areas. Pets are strictly prohibited in posted resource protection areas and must be physically restrained at all times on a leash not exceeding 6 feet in length.

For further information, please call (252) 473-2111 or check the Google Earth map at:

http://www.nps.gov/caha/planyourvisit/off-road-vehicle-use.htm

-NPS-

Did You Know?

Lightning whelks are one of the few species of

Lightning whelks eat about one large clam per month. The whelk pries the clam open with its muscular foot, wedges the clam open with its shell, then eats the soft inside of the clam. Lightning whelk shells, which whorl to the left, wash up on the beach at Cape Hatteras National Seashore.