• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

Ramp 43 Reopens to ORV and Pedestrian Access

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Date: May 29, 2014
Contact: Outer Banks Group, 252-475-9034

National Park Service Outer Banks Group Superintendent Barclay Trimble announced today the reopening of Ramp 43 to Off-Road Vehicle (ORV) and pedestrian access.Park staff first observed the hatching of piping plover chicks on the morning of May 23. For the past three days no piping plover chicks have been observed; their disappearance most likely due to avian predation.However, adult piping plovers continue to forage and utilize this area.If breeding behavior is observed, a common occurrence when the initial nest or chicks are lost, the appropriate protection buffers will be installed again.

As of May 29 at 9:00 a.m., Ramp 43 is open to ORV access with approximately one tenth of a mile of ORV access at Ramp 43.There is pedestrian access south of Ramp 43 to Ramp 44 along the ocean shoreline, which is subject to change.In addition, there is pedestrian access from Ramp 44 south for approximately four tenths of a mile.

For information on areas within the Seashore that remain open for recreational uses, see:

http://www.nps.gov/caha/planyourvisit/off-road-vehicle-use.htm

-NPS-

Did You Know?

Ocracoke Inlet was one of the most heavily traveled inlets in the 1700s.

In the 1700s, Ocracoke Inlet was one of the busiest inlets in the East. It was one of the few navigable waterways for ships accessing inland ports such as Elizabeth City, Edenton or New Bern. It was here that Blackbeard the pirate found the inlet's heavy shipping traffic ripe for easy pickings.