• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

Pedestrian Access Open to Cape Point, July 7, 2010

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Date: July 7, 2010
Contact: Cyndy Holda, 252-473-2111 x148

Superintendent Mike Murray announced today that the east side of Cape Point has reopened to pedestrian access, effective immediately, via a pedestrian access corridor that begins about 100 meters south of Ramp 44.  Although the remaining piping plover chicks in the Cape Point area had fledged by last week, access to the Point has remained closed due to a resource protection closure for unfledged American oystercatcher chicks south of Ramp 44. The American oystercatcher chicks, which are provided a 200 meter buffer under the consent decree, have now fledged and the access corridor has reopened to pedestrian access. Pets are not allowed in the pedestrian corridor.  Young American oystercatcher fledglings are relatively large birds and weak flyers, and are less capable of getting out of the way of moving vehicles or pets off leash. There is a two week waiting period after American oystercatcher chicks fledge before an area is reopened to ORVs or pets. It is expected that the access corridor to the Point will reopen to ORV access and pets in about two weeks, provided no new resource closures occur in the area.

Temporary resource protection areas are established to protect threatened and endangered species, including piping plovers and sea turtles, as well as state or federal species of concern, including American oystercatchers and colonial waterbirds (terns and black skimmers). For more information, call 252-473-2111 ext. 148.

Did You Know?

Ocracoke Inlet was one of the most heavily traveled inlets in the 1700s.

In the 1700s, Ocracoke Inlet was one of the busiest inlets in the East. It was one of the few navigable waterways for ships accessing inland ports such as Elizabeth City, Edenton or New Bern. It was here that Blackbeard the pirate found the inlet's heavy shipping traffic ripe for easy pickings.