• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

NPS Temporary Fire Ban in Effect

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Date: June 22, 2011
Contact: Outer Banks Group, 252-473-2111

NPS Temporary Fire Ban in Effect

Superintendent Mike Murray announced today that Cape Hatteras National Seashore will comply with the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources temporary ban on all open burning in areas of North Carolina south of U.S. 64 and east of Interstate 95, which includes Dare and Hyde counties where the Seashore is located. The ban on open burning is necessary because of the dry weather conditions and an increase in wildland fire activity throughout eastern North Carolina. The Dare County Fire Marshall’s Office has also issued a ban on all open burning for the unincorporated areas of Dare County until further notice.

In conjunction with the State’s ban on open burning, all beach fires are temporarily banned on Cape Hatteras National Seashore beaches. The use of grills for cooking is still permitted. Caution should be exercised while cooking outdoors and lit materials should be confined to the grill apparatus. Visitors are asked to dispose of used charcoal and any smoking materials, such as cigar or cigarette butts, carefully and away from any combustible materials. Additionally, visitors are reminded that fireworks are strictly prohibited in the National Seashore.

For more information, contact park headquarters at 252-473-2111 ext. 118.

Did You Know?

This artist's rendering shows the U.S.S. Monitor foundering in a storm off of Cape Hatteras in December 1862.

The U.S.S. Monitor sank off Cape Hatteras during a storm in December 1862. The wreck's location was a mystery until 1973 when a research vessel found the ship 16 miles off the cape in 230 feet of water. In 1975, the Monitor was named the nation’s first National Marine Sanctuary.