• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

NPS Operations & Facilities Resume Normal Hours

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Date: September 5, 2010
Contact: Cyndy Holda, 252-473-2111 x148

Superintendent Mike Murray announced today that all park facilities and most areas in the Outer Bank Group have reopened to the public and normal operations and services have resumed.

After Hurricane Earl passed by the Outer Banks, all park resources and facilities were assessed for storm impacts. Damage assessments were identified including loss of shingles from rooftops, minimal water leakage in some facilities, scattered debris and tree limbs, and loss of signs, posts and fencing materials for some resource closures. The clean–up process will be on-going due to standing water, minor flooding and removal of tree limb debris.

On Cape Hatteras National Seashore beaches, all ocean and soundside beach areas were evaluated for safe driving conditions and reopened except for four areas; two on Hatteras Island and two on Ocracoke Island. Ramp 44, 45, Salt Pond Road, and the Interdunal Road in the Buxton area remain closed due to flooded conditions; the Pole Road and soundside access off of Pole Road south of Hatteras Village remain closed due to flooded conditions. Cape Point Campground is closed for the season. On Ocracoke Island, Ramp 59 and Ramp 72 remain closed due to flooded conditions. Park visitors can expect to see some resource protection closures in effect for sea turtle nests on many Seashore beaches.

All park facilities on Ocracoke Island, Hatteras Island, including the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, Bodie Island, Fort Raleigh National Historic Site, and Wright Brothers National Memorial are open and have resumed normal hours of operation.

For more information, contact 252-473-2111, ext. 148.

Did You Know?

Sea Whip, though it looks like a plant, is actually whole colony of animals.

A piece of sea whip that washes up on the beach at Cape Hatteras National Seashore is not a plant, but the skeleton of a whole colony of animals. A tiny animal lived in each hole on the yellow, orange or purple stems. It had a mouth, a stomach and eight tentacles to catch food.