• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

NPS Beach Access Update for Thanksgiving Weekend

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Date: November 24, 2009
Contact: Cyndy Holda, 252-473-2111 Ext. 148

Park visitors will find that winter beach conditions prevail on Cape Hatteras National Seashore beaches during Thanksgiving week.  The strong nor’easter that swept up the East Coast last week inundated many of the Off-Road Vehicle (ORV) ramps and flooded conditions linger in some areas but almost all of the beach access ramps are open to the public at this time.

 

Ramp conditions as Tuesday, November 24, 2009 are as follows:

 

Bodie Island District:

Ramp 2, 4 and 23 are open.

 

Hatteras Island District:

Ramp 27, 30, 34, 38, 43 are open with some remaining areas of standing water;  Cape Point is accessible via Ramp 43.

Ramp 44 and 45, Salt Pond Road and the Interdunal Road between Ramps 44 and 45 remain closed due to washouts and standing water.

Ramp 49 and 55 are open.  The Pole Road, Cable Crossing and Spur Road sound access are open.

 

There are two remaining sea turtle nests on Hatteras Island;  one is located approximately 0.2 of a mile north of Ramp 49 and may possibly affect ORV access at a later date;  the second is located in front of the old Cape Hatteras Lighthouse site and will not affect ORV access.

 

Ocracoke Island District:

Ramp 59, 67, 68 70 and 72 are all open and passable with some debris. 

 

Standing water, which may be saline, brackish or fresh, can be found with winter beach and tide conditions and may be unsafe for off-road vehicle travel.  Beach travelers should use caution when contemplating driving through standing water.

 

The last remaining turtle nest on the Ocracoke Island is located just south of Ramp 70 and blocks through access to Ramp 72.  The nest, which is past its hatch date (day 99), was checked Monday morning, November 23th and it is still an active nest with viable eggs inside. 

Did You Know?

The Principal Lightkeeper's Quarters and the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse move toward their new homes, a safer distance from the ocean.

The Cape Hatteras Lighthouse is the tallest brick structure ever moved. When it was built in 1870, it stood 1,500 feet from the shore. By 1999, the lighthouse was within 100 feet of the ocean. To protect it from the encroaching sea, it was moved inland a total of 2,900 feet over a 23-day period.