• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

New Additions to NPS Ocracoke Pony Herd

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
Date: December 9, 2009
Contact: Cyndy Holda, 252-473-2111 Ext. 148
Contact: Kenny Ballance, 252-928-5111

Superintendent Mike Murray announced today that Cape Hatteras National Seashore has adopted two Shackleford Banks ponies from the Foundation for Shackleford Horses, Inc. in Beaufort, NC.  The two fillies, named Sacajawea and Jitterbug, will be delivered to Ocracoke Pony Pens on Sunday, December 13.  The ponies will be temporarily displayed for the visiting public to view in a special enclosure near the observation platform from 11:00 am to 3:00 pm. 

 

Sacajawea and Jitterbug, both approximately 2 years old, were removed from Cape Lookout National Seashore in September and received veterinary and farrier care prior to the ferry trip to their new home on Ocracoke Island.  The addition of these two ponies will assist park managers in meeting one of the Seashore’s primary pony management objectives of reintroducing the genetic strain common to Outer Banks horses.  This strain is typically identified by the brown body and white face markings commonly seen in other Outer Banks horses.  Maintaining the genetic diversity and herd size is important to herd survival. 

 

Thousands of park visitors cherish the Ocracoke ponies and contribute to the Adopt-A-Pony fund annually.  “The NPS and the Foundation for Shackleford Horses have a mutual goal of preserving Outer Banks horses for the people of the United States.  We are appreciative of the good work of Ms. Carolyn Mason and the Foundation which has enabled us to introduce two new fillies to the Ocracoke herd” stated Superintendent Mike Murray. 

 

For more information, check out the following websites:

www.shacklefordhorses.org

http://www.nps.gov/caha/historyculture/ocracokeponies.htm

Did You Know?

Giant Water Flea

This is not a space alien, even though it has a transparent body, wings, and a very large eye. Giant water fleas grow up to 2 cm long, and are a food source for small fish that shelter in the sound. You can swim with them in the sound-side waters off Cape Hatteras National Seashore.