• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

Final 2011 Beach Access Update for Cape Hatteras National Seashore

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Date: September 22, 2011
Contact: Outer Banks Group, 252-473-2111

This is the final weekly beach access report for the 2011 season at Cape Hatteras National Seashore. We anticipate there will be very few additional significant changes in access since Hurricane Irene reduced the number of sea turtle nests remaining on Seashore beaches. Any significant changes in access that occur this fall or winter will be reported in a press release, as needed. Minor adjustments in access will simply be reflected in periodic updates of the Google Earth map. We appreciate your interest, your comments, and your input over the past six months.Enjoy the great fishing and wildlife viewing opportunities found on the park's fall and winter beaches!

Beach and soundside access throughout the Seashore:

·Ramps that are open to pedestrian and ORV access:Ramps 2, 4, 27, 30, 34, 38, 43, 44, 45, 49, 55, 67, 70, and 72

  • Ramp 1 is open to pedestrian access but closed to ORV access
  • Ramps 59 and 68 remained closed to ORVs pending repairs from storm damage
  • Seasonally closed beaches in the Tri-Villages (Rodanthe/Waves/Salvo) area will remain closed to ORVs and Ramp 23 is closed to entry at the request of Dare County until normal visitor access is allowed back into those villages
  • From September 16 to November 15, night driving from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. for ORVs on any open and accessible beaches is allowed with a valid, signed permit. The permit must be in plain view on the dashboard of the vehicle. The free permits are available at NPS visitor centers and ranger stations, local tackle shops, and on-line at: http://www.nps.gov/caha/planyourvisit/off-road-vehicle-use.htm
  • Most of the established soundside access areas in the National Seashore are open to pedestrian or ORV access

On-site signage provides the most accurate and current indication of public use restrictions or closures. Knowledge of tidal changes and rough surf conditions is important, as some beach areas may be inaccessible at high tide.Caution should be exercised while traveling the beaches of the park after any significant weather event. For more information, check Google Earth maps at http://www.nps.gov/caha/planyourvisit/googleearthmap.htm

For additional general park information, visit the park website at www.nps.gov/caha

or call 252-473-2111.

Did You Know?

This artist's rendering shows the U.S.S. Monitor foundering in a storm off of Cape Hatteras in December 1862.

The U.S.S. Monitor sank off Cape Hatteras during a storm in December 1862. The wreck's location was a mystery until 1973 when a research vessel found the ship 16 miles off the cape in 230 feet of water. In 1975, the Monitor was named the nation’s first National Marine Sanctuary.