• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT SELECTED FOR THE OUTER BANKS GROUP

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Date: February 6, 2008
Contact: Outer Bank Group, (252) 473-2111  ext 148

Superintendent Mike Murray is pleased to announce that Darrell Lee Echols was recently selected as the new Deputy Superintendent for the National Park Service (NPS) Outer Banks Group. The Outer Banks Group includes Cape Hatteras National Seashore, Wright Brothers National Memorial, and Fort Raleigh National Historic Site in North Carolina.

Echols is currently the Chief of Science and Resources Management at Padre Island National Seashore in Texas and has over 18 years of national seashore experience. He is a native of south Texas and has a Bachelor of Science degree in marine biology from Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi.

"Darrell Echols is the right person to fill this important position at this time," said Superintendent Mike Murray. "He has extensive experience in dealing with complex coastal issues and by all accounts has outstanding communication and management skills. He will be a tremendous help in managing the many challenging issues faced by the three parks of the Outer Banks Group."

Echols is married to the former Nancy Boone. The Echols have two children, Hailey, age 8 and Brian, age 4. The Echols family will move to the Outer Banks in late February 2008. "My family and I are very excited about moving to the Outer Banks and experiencing the East Coast," said Darrell Echols. "I am especially looking forward to working with the management team and the community on the diverse issues facing the Outer Banks Group."

-NPS-

Did You Know?

The Hatteras Island Weather Station is one of only three remaining weather stations in the country.

The U.S. Weather Bureau Station on Hatteras Island was built in 1901 and was one of 11 stations built around the country. It is one of only three remaining stations nationwide, and the only one in the nation restored to its 1901 condition. The station was reopened in 2007 to house a visitor center.