• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

Hatteras and Ocracoke Islands Remain Closed to General Public

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Date: September 1, 2011
Contact: General Park Information, 252-473-2111
Contact: Hurricane Park Recovery Information, 252-473-2111 x117

Hatteras and Ocracoke Islands remain closed to General Public

Manteo, North Carolina: Superintendent Mike Murray announced although the park has reopened beaches and many ramps along the Cape Hatteras National Seashore, access to Hatteras and Ocracoke islands remain open only to residents already on the islands, due to damage to roads and other infrastructure in this area.For updated beach access information for the park see the latest Google Earth beach access maps: http://www.nps.gov/caha/planyourvisit/googleearthmap.htm

The Oregon inlet campground also remains closed due to damages from Hurricane Irene.

The Wright Brothers National Monument and Fort Raleigh National Historic site are fully reopened.

Coquina Beach and all its facilities has also reopened.

102 National Park Service staff from 27 parks in 18 states across the country have been mobilized as part of this emergency response to support assessment of damage to park facilities and resources and assist in reopening remaining facilities as safely and quickly as possible.

Damages confirmed so far to park and concession/permitted service providers in the Outer Banks National Parks include damaged rooftops, water intrusion either through flooding or roof leakage in numerous facilities, scattered debris and tree limbs, and missing or damaged boardwalks, signs, posts and fencing materials. Resource advisors are in the field assessing natural and cultural resource impacts as well.

For more information, contact 252-473-2111.

-NPS-

Did You Know?

The Principal Lightkeeper's Quarters and the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse move toward their new homes, a safer distance from the ocean.

The Cape Hatteras Lighthouse is the tallest brick structure ever moved. When it was built in 1870, it stood 1,500 feet from the shore. By 1999, the lighthouse was within 100 feet of the ocean. To protect it from the encroaching sea, it was moved inland a total of 2,900 feet over a 23-day period.