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Beach Access Update - November 16, 2009

Flooded Ramp 72

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Date: November 16, 2009
Contact: Outer Banks Group, (252) 473-2111

The strong nor’easter that swept up the East Coast over the weekend has left impressive after effects in its path on the beaches of Cape Hatteras National Seashore.  Park visitors and ORV users will encounter noticeable differences in ocean beach and dune conditions and caution is advised. 

 

Standing water, which may be saline, brackish or fresh, sometimes over a foot deep, may be found in many locations with deep gullies draining inland areas which create unpredictable, and sometimes unsafe terrain for travel.  Natural vegetative debris, such as uprooted trees and beach grasses, as well as debris from destroyed boardwalks and structures, are deposited on the beach following a wind/water event of such a sustained nature.  Beach travelers will encounter such debris on the beaches in all areas and extreme caution should be used.

 

The following beach access ramps are open for ORV use. 

 

Bodie Island District:

Ramp 2, 4, and 23 are all open and passable with some debris.

 

Hatteras Island District:

Ramp 27, 30, 34, 38, 43, 49, 55 are all open and passable with some debris.  Ramp 43 has standing water but is accessible.  Cape Point is accessible via Ramp 43.

 

Ramp 44 and 45 are closed.  Salt Pond Road is flooded and remains closed.  The Interdunal Road between Ramp 44 and 45 is flooded and closed.  The Salt Pond outflow, approximately 300 yards west of Cape Point, is draining water from the area and travel through the outflow is not recommended. 

 

South of Ramp 55, the Pole Road is closed due to flooded conditions.  Cable Crossing access is closed.  Access to Hatteras Inlet and the Spur Road are accessible by traveling south from Ramp 55 on the ocean beach.

 

Ocracoke Island District:

Ramp 59, 67, 68 and 70 are all open and passable with some debris.  Ramp 72 is closed due to flooded conditions.  The last remaining turtle nest on the Ocracoke Island is located just south of Ramp 70 and blocks through access to Ramp 72.  The nest, which is past its hatch date (day 90), was checked Monday morning, November 16th and it is still an active nest with viable eggs inside.  The nest is expected to hatch this week with the predicted warmer, sunny days ahead.

Did You Know?

Ocracoke Inlet was one of the most heavily traveled inlets in the 1700s.

In the 1700s, Ocracoke Inlet was one of the busiest inlets in the East. It was one of the few navigable waterways for ships accessing inland ports such as Elizabeth City, Edenton or New Bern. It was here that Blackbeard the pirate found the inlet's heavy shipping traffic ripe for easy pickings.