• The Great House at Casa Grande Ruins stands out for miles

    Casa Grande Ruins

    National Monument Arizona

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    The Visitor Center is OPEN! Major heating/cooling system work is done. Fees are being collected and passes are available.

National Park Service Rangers

What do they do?

The National Park Service and park rangers care for and protect more than 380 national parks, monuments, memorials, preserves, historic sites, seashores and other areas across the United States.

Core Values

 
A Park Ranger interprets the 'Big House' for Secretary of the Interior, Gayle Norton.

Secretary of the Interior, Gayle Norton visiting Casa Grande Ruins.

NPS Photo

The core values of the National Park service are:

  • Tradition: We are proud of it; we learn from it; we are not bound by it.
  • Respect: We embrace each other’s differences so that we may enrich the well-being of everyone.
  • Integrity: We deal honestly and fairly with the public and one another.
  • Excellence: We strive continually to learn and improve so that we may achieve the highest ideals of public service.
  • Shared Stewardship: We share a commitment to resource stewardship with the global preservation community.

What does it mean to be a ranger?

That's a hard question to answer because there are so many different kinds of rangers. All park rangers protect and preserve natural and cultural resources, but they accomplish these tasks in many different ways.

Some rangers fight fires and keep nature safe, others teach about the past. Some study and protect animals or plants. Some maintain structures and roads. All rangers help keep the parks clean. Rangers rescue people, find lost kids, and help make sure everyone is safe. One of the most important parts of being a park ranger is to help everyone understand and appreciate our national treasures so people like you will be willing to care about and care for these wonderful places.

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Did You Know?

The 'Big House' at Casa Grande Ruins circa 1900.

An estimated six million pounds of caliche were used in the construction of the Casa Grande. Caliche is a naturally occurring soil consisting of clay, sand and calcium carbonate found in the deserts of the southwest.