• The Great House at Casa Grande Ruins stands out for miles

    Casa Grande Ruins

    National Monument Arizona

Casa Grande Ruins Explorer Post

What are Explorers?

Exploring is a worksite-based program for young men and women who are 14 (and have completed the eighth grade) through 20 years of age. Explorer Post organizations match youth career interests and develop activities that initiate growth, learning and development. Currently Posts are collaborating with Police and Fire Departments, Law and Government Professionals, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) Professionals, Aviation, Veterinarians, and more. Students have the potential to job shadow, submit for scholarships, learn the type of skills and abilities required of a specific job, have executive level mentors, and the opportunity to attend national conferences and competitions. Explorer Posts provide programs focused on Leadership, Drug Prevention, Character Education and more.

"We are excited to expand our programs and relevancy for teens," said Casa Grande Ruins National Monument Superintendent Karl Cordova. "Explorers will complete projects that will help the park while they learn new skills. It is a new program for us and a change from Law Enforcement only Explorer Posts of the past." Teens attending the "First Night" gathering will chart the course of the Post deciding when and how often the group will meet. Future year's themes will be decided by Post membership and may rotate through several career options.

 

What do Explorer Posts Do?

The Casa Grande Ruins Post will work toward the Arts and Humanities Career Archievement Award which is a national recognition. This will require a series of workshops done during the Post meeting time and a minimum of 50 hours of Community Service done beyond the meetings. The overall goal for the Post will be to create videos that will be posted on-line via this website (nps.gov), and likely accessed by park visitors using smart phones and other devices while in the park as well.

A partnership with the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism will work to teach new skills for videography. Other park partners and park volunteers will assist with workshops on photography, graphic arts, and learning flint knapping, pottery, basket weaving, gourd carving, and other Native American Arts which will be featured in the videos.

 

Why should I join?

Because it will be fun! This is like a club in that you will have opportunities to do recreational things (such as hike, camp, ropes course) but it goes beyond that with learning real world skills related to real world jobs. Participating in Explorers will show you chances for scholarships, awards, and networking.

You will develop:

  • work experiences to begin building your resume'
  • an appreciation for the hard work necessary to succeed
  • an understanding of the importance of teamwork in a professional setting

You will have an opportunity to participate in hands-on projects to give you a real feel for whether this career is the right one for you.

You will have an opportunity to network with professionals who work in these careers every day - they are using the latest technology, they are aware of emerging trends, and they know what it takes to get into college for their specific career.

You will learn about the educational requirements for a career in Arts & Humanities and will receive tangible advice on steps you could take now to prepare and position yourself for a successful career in the field of Arts & Humanities

Arts & Humanities Career Exploring will provide you with the following benefits:

  • Improved self-confidence
  • Leadership experience and social network development
  • Fun and Exciting "hands-on" career experiences
  • Community service opportunities
  • College & Career Readiness preparation
 

What will it cost?

The application fee is $16.50. That covers joining a National organization and a small insurance fee to keep all Explorers safe while participating in official activities.

Time-wise the Post will meet either weekly or every two weeks, as decided by the group. In addition, special field trips may be offered on weekends as well as special state-wide opportunities (such as conferences, hiking weekends, camping gatherings). The 50 hours of community service to earn the National Award will be done beyond the regular meeting times, most likely near the park's American Indian Arts and Music Festival in February.

 

How do I join?

Attend a meeting and sign up! It will cost $16.50 with the application, plus a signature of a parent or guardian if you are not yet age 18. First meeting will be during the last week of September 2013, in the park's visitor center. Details to be announced.

Did You Know?

A burrowing owl guarding its burrow at Casa Grande Ruins.

Burrowing owls are unique among birds because they nest underground in existing ground squirrel, coyote, and badger burrows. They are also commonly associated with humans and will frequently nest in burrows along irrigation ditches, canals, and even in people’s yards.