• Atlantic Ocean beach at Cape Cod National Seashore

    Cape Cod

    National Seashore Massachusetts

Cape Cod National Seashore to Host - Discoveries from Native American Shell Middens

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Date: September 27, 2011
Contact: Sue Haley, 508-255-3421

On Cape Cod, large shell-bearing archaeological sites have been examined by archeologists since the 1860s and were thought to be only used for refuse disposal. Only recently, has this come into question.Join University of Massachusetts Ph.D. candidate and Eastern Connecticut State University adjunct faculty member Katie Kirakosian, at Cape Cod National Seashore's Salt Pond Visitor Center Auditorium in Eastham on Saturday, October 15 at 2 PM to learn about this subject. Ms. Kirakosian will discuss how studying these sites, contributes to our understanding of the Native American people of Cape Cod, and sheds light on the importance of shellfish to them for over 3,000 years. The program is free, accessible, and open to the public.

If you go: Salt Pond Visitor Center is located at the intersection of Route 6 and Nauset Road in Eastham and is open daily from 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM.The center includes a lobby with expansive views of Salt Pond, Nauset Marsh, and the Atlantic; a museum featuring the park's natural and cultural stories; staff to assist with trip planning; and a store with books, maps, puzzles, games, t-shirts, and 50th anniversary commemorative items. There are short films shown throughout the day. The Buttonbush and Nauset Marsh Trails, and the Nauset Bike Trail are located nearby. For more information on Cape Cod National Seashore programs, check the park's website, www.nps.gov/caco. Follow us on Twitter @CapeCodNPS.

www.nps.gov

About the National Park Service: More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America's 395 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at www.nps.gov.

Did You Know?

Typha latifolia (common cattail)

Most of the cattails on Cape Cod are an exotic, invasive species. While Typha latifolia (common cattail) is native, Typha angustifolia (narrowleaf cattail) is a Eurasian plant that is believed to have been brought to North America by the early colonists.