• Atlantic Ocean beach at Cape Cod National Seashore

    Cape Cod

    National Seashore Massachusetts

A Call For Artists to Exhibit Work at Salt Pond Visitor Center

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Date: August 14, 2012
Contact: Sue Haley, District Interpreter, 508-255-3421 ext. 15

The outer Cape Cod landscape has long served as muse for artists from around the world.This winter, Cape Cod National Seashore's Salt Pond Visitor Center will host a series of art exhibitions focusing on the seashore's many varied natural and cultural resources. The seashore is currently accepting applications from artists interested in showing their work in month-long exhibitions through the autumn, winter and spring.Those interested in exhibiting their work as part of the series should contact Sue Haley at 508-255-3421 ext. 15.

Perspectives: Seeing Cape Cod National Seashore Through Art showcases artists who derive inspiration from the seashore's resources and stories, and whose works reflect the natural beauty and cultural significance of Cape Cod.Artwork accepted for the series should reflect the mission of Cape Cod National Seashore and be acceptable for a diverse family audience.

Seashore Superintendent George Price commented, "The singular beauty of the Cape, combined with its rich heritage, seems to appeal to an exceptional caliber of artist, many of whom we are fortunate to have living as our own neighbors." Past exhibitors include photographers Miah Nate Johnson and Stephanie Foster, The Bayberry Quilters exhibiting their textile media, and painters from the Eastham Painters Guild.

Salt Pond Visitor Center is located at the intersection of Route 6 and Nauset Road in Eastham.The center is open daily from 9:00 to 4:30 in the winter except on Thanksgiving and Christmas, and features a museum, theater, bookstore, and expansive views of Salt Pond and Nauset Marsh.

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Did You Know?

tropical fish found in Cape Cod waters

Tropical fish may occur in the waters of Cape Cod National Seashore. Tropical fish can be found in coastal areas all the way to the Canadian Maritime. Eggs and larvae of tropical fish are caught in the Gulf Stream and transported north. These fish eventually perish as the water cools.