• Atlantic Ocean beach at Cape Cod National Seashore

    Cape Cod

    National Seashore Massachusetts

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    The stairs at Nauset Light Beach in Eastham are closed due to storm damage. Herring Cove North Lot in Provincetown sustained damage resulting in closure of multiple parking spaces. The Nauset Marsh Trail bridge was destroyed in a 2012 storm. More »

Atlantic Research & Learning Center

Aerial view of the Provincelands, Cape Cod National Seashore
Aerial view of the Province Lands, Cape Cod National Seashore
Photo by John Budreski
 
The Atlantic Research & Learning Center (ARLC), located at the Cape Cod National Seashore (CACO), is one of a nationwide network of Research Learning Centers maintained and operated by the National Park Service. The ARC was created by charter in 1999 as a component of the National Park Service's Natural Resource Challenge. This initiative was part of a broad effort by the National Park Service to expand upon the role of science inside parks in the 21st century. The fundamental aims of the Research Learning Centers are to increase and expand upon scientific research taking place within national parks; to foster research which will contribute to management decisions; and to provide educational opportunities for students, universities, educators, and the public.
 
ARLC Brocure 2013

Click here to view the ARLC Brochure

Located in historic North Truro, Massachusetts, the ARLC is located on the grounds of the Highlands Center at Cape Cod National Seashore, which is administered by the NPS in partnership with the private, non-profit Highlands Center Inc. The ARLC boasts a variety of amenities and support to facilitate research including:

  • Cape Cod National Seashore's 44,600 acres of marine, estuarine, fresh water, and terrestrial ecosystems
  • Laboratory and desk space
  • Classroom and lecture auditorium
  • Field equipment
  • Analytical facilities
  • Housing
  • GIS and ecosystem monitoring data
  • Collaboration with CACO scientists
  • The Charles S. Davidson Memorial Library
  • Opportunities for science communication to the general public

Did You Know?

cranberry bog at harvest time

The word “cranberry” originated as a contraction of crane berry, a name given to the plant by early settlers because the flower resembles the head of a crane.