• Canoeing on the Buffalo

    Buffalo

    National River Arkansas

Mill Creek Sewage

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Date: June 22, 2010
Contact: Caven Clark, 870-365-2790

MILL CREEK SEWAGE CONTINUES TO PRESENT HEALTH RISKS

Health concerns remain regarding bacteria concentrations in Mill Creek, a tributary of the Buffalo River in Newton County, Arkansas, following a breakdown in a local septic system in January of 2009. The Marble Falls temporary lift station continues in operation while funding is sought to repair or replace the system. Buffalo National River is continuing to take water samples in the affected area. Because the results of these samples are not known until 24 hours after the sample is taken, the National Park Service is posting health advisory signs to alert the public to possible risk in the affected area. The affected area includes Mill Creek and the Buffalo River from the mouth of Mill Creek to approximately one quarter mile downstream from Crow Hole. Signs will be removed when the health risk factors are resolved.

State standards for bacteria in recreational waters have been and can be expected to continue to be exceeded after periods of high rainfall. These events may result in the concentration of bacteria in the affected area increasing the risk to health, particularly for activities involving direct contact with the water. Canoeing between Pruitt and Hasty is safe and recreational activities in all other areas of Buffalo National River are not affected. BNR does not expect this condition to have significant impact on the overall visitation and recreational use of the park since swimming and other similar recreational

activities can easily be redirected to other locations along the river.

For further information or the latest bacteria readings please call 1-888-692-1162.

Did You Know?

Two bull elk in pasture at Buffalo National River.

Did you know that over 400 Rocky Mountain elk live in and around Buffalo National River? In the early 1980s elk were relocated to the Buffalo River region to replace an eastern elk subspecies that was extirpated in the 1800s.