• Canoeing on the Buffalo

    Buffalo

    National River Arkansas

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FLOATING SEASON IN FULL SWING AT BUFFALO NATIONAL RIVER

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Date: May 10, 2013
Contact: Caven Clark, 870/365-2790

Despite cooler than normal temperatures, the floating season is off to a strong start at Buffalo National River.  After the drought conditions in 2012, floaters are thrilled to see the rise in the river level and the number of canoes and kayaks on the river has picked up dramatically.

While Buffalo National River was recently recognized by National Geographic as one of the Top Ten Underappreciated National Parks, the popularity of the park is growing and visitation exceeds one million people annually.  More than 100,000 visitors float the Buffalo River each year.  But according to Jesse Jefferson, owner of Buffalo River Canoes, floating isn't the only attraction.  "Visitors are discovering that Buffalo River offers numerous opportunities for outdoor recreation.  Besides floating, they enjoy hiking, camping, beautiful waterfalls, elk viewing, bird watching.  It's truly a four season park with something for everyone," said Jefferson, who owns one of twelve businesses authorized by the National Park Service to provide canoe rentals and shuttle services on the river.

The park website (www.nps.gov/buff) offers helpful trip planning information to ensure a safe and enjoyable visit and the Facebook page (www.facebook.com/ buffnatlriver) is updated almost daily.  Real time river levels and floating recommendations can be found online athttp://ar.water.usgs.gov/ buffaloriver/.


 

Did You Know?

Unknown children on porch of the William Villines house.

Did you know that Buffalo National River preserves many pioneer homesteads ranging from the 1840s to the 1930s? These structures document the struggles and lifeways of people that carved a living out of the lush forests of the Buffalo River region.