• Canoeing on the Buffalo

    Buffalo

    National River Arkansas

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  • Give Us A Hand

    Budget constraints and fewer staff have changed our operations. Be prepared for your visit. More »

  • Available Services

    All campgrounds are open except Erbie Campground in the Upper District. Trash receptacles have been removed from many areas throughout the park; please be prepared to carry out your own trash and recycling. View link for more information. More »

Lesson Plans & Teacher Guides

Individual lesson plans for the Day By The Buffalo program are listed below. Click on the lesson plan title to download the pdf file. These are the lessons currently available. Due to staffing limitations, some programs previously offered have been eliminated.

The Powerpoints link provides several powerpoint presentations to introduce your students to their Day by the Buffalo program.

 

Pre-trip Classroom Lesson
National Treasures
This lesson of pre-trip classroom activities will help students identify the significance of Buffalo River to our nation. It reviews the role of national park system areas and the use and preservation of these areas for future generations.

Upper River area - Ponca/Boxley Valley
Lost Valley Hike
Through experiment, research projects and games in the classroom and in the field, students learn about the importance of our natural surroundings and the role of human beings in the protection of the outdoors.

At the Water's Edge
One way to determine the health of a river is to look at what organisms are living in it. Students learn how to identify and inventory organisms through actual hands-on activities.

Boxley Mill
Boxley Mill continued grinding grain long after mills in other areas of the country had ceased their operations.

Middle River - Tyler Bend area
River View Stroll
Forests are more than a collection of trees. Plants and animals of many types can live in forests, forming communities that may interact. These activities will introduce your class to various forest communities at Buffalo National River.

Collier Homestead Tour
Change came slow to the Ozark mountains, and settlers depended upon their own resourcefulness long after "conveniences" were common in other regions of the United States.

At the Water's Edge
One way to determine the health of a river is to look at what organisms are living in it. Students learn how to identify and inventory organisms through actual hands-on activities.

Silver Hill Cave
BuffaloNational River encompasses about 10% of all the cave systems in Arkansas. The Underground Classroom provides students with a safe, wild cave experience todiscover how caves form and what lives underground.

Lower River area - Buffalo Point and Rush
Overlook Hike
The Ozarks of northern Arkansas harbor a great variety of plant and animal life due to factors such as location, elevation and climate. Buffalo National River protects many different types of habitat, harboring a wide diversity of species.

Rush Ghost Town
The Rush Creek Mining District is recognized as the most important zinc-producing area in the State of Arkansas. A resource like zinc caused the development of a whole new industry and its associated impact on the economy.

Indian Rockhouse Hike
The vast diversity of natural resources of the Buffalo River valley has attracted people for thousands of years. The Ozarks is a biological crossroads, exhibiting species from east and west, north and south, many unexpectedly found in association with other species. This biodiversity provided for the needs of the people that lived in this region.

At the Water's Edge
One way to determine the health of a river is to look at what organisms are living in it. Students learn how to identify and inventory organisms through actual hands-on activities.

Did You Know?

Unknown children on porch of the William Villines house.

Did you know that Buffalo National River preserves many pioneer homesteads ranging from the 1840s to the 1930s? These structures document the struggles and lifeways of people that carved a living out of the lush forests of the Buffalo River region.