• Bryce Canyon Amphitheater

    Bryce Canyon

    National Park Utah

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  • U.S. Highway 89 Bryce Canyon to Grand Canyon

    Road damage south of Page, Arizona will impact travel between Bryce Canyon and Grand Canyon National Parks. Click for a travel advisory and link to a map with suggested alternate routes: More »

  • Sunset Campground Construction

    From April-July 2014, three new restroom facilities will be constructed in Sunset Campground. Visitors may experience construction noise and dust, as well as some campsite and restroom closures. 'Sunset Campground' webpage has additional information. More »

  • Bryce Point to Peekaboo Connector Trail Closure

    Due to a large rockslide, the connecting trail from Bryce Point to Peekaboo Loop is closed. Trail will be reopened once repairs are made. The Peekaboo Loop is open, but must be accessed from Sunset or Sunrise Point.

  • Wall Street Section of Navajo Loop Closed

    Due to dangerous conditions (falling rock and treacherous, icy switchbacks), the Wall Street section of the Navajo Loop Trail is CLOSED. It will reopen in Spring once freezing temperatures have subsided.

  • Backcountry Campsite Closures

    Due to bear activity at select campsites in Bryce Canyon's backcountry, two backcountry campsites have been closed until further notice: Sheep Creek and Iron Spring.

Wyoming Paintbrush

Common Name(s): Wyoming Paintbrush, Narrowleaf Paintbrush, Linearleaf Paintbrush
Scientific Name: Castilleja linariifolia
Size (height) English & Metric: 18"-36" (45-91 cm)
Habitat: Shrublands and grass meadows
Flowering Season (for Bryce region): May - October
Range: Wyoming and down into the Colorado Plateau
 
Wyoming Paintbrush

Wyoming Paintbrush

lee dittman

General Description:
A member of the figwort family, this species is unusually tall for a paintbrush. It favors moist areas, but it is also drought tolerant enough to be found in sagebrush flats. It has narrow, green linear leaves with an alternate arrangement on the stems. Flowers are actually inside each of the loosely to densely clustered upper leaves which form scarlet red tubes around them and from which the pale green corolla protrudes. Stems range in color from gray-green to crimson to purple.

Plant Lore:
This is a semi-parasitic plant that uses its roots to penetrate and secure nutrients and water from other plants. American Indians in Utah may have used paintbrush as a blood purifier, and to treat nosebleeds. This species was also prized as a treatment for venereal diseases.

Conservation Message:
As with all other native plants, this species is protected in National Parks. While sampling berries and nuts is permissible, it is illegal to collect plants for herbal or medicinal purposes.

When and where to see at Bryce:
This species is found in most locations in the park but is especially common along roadsides and most trails. The paintbrush grows amid other plants. It is often found among manzanita, bitterbrush and sagebrush, but not exclusively so. It is the most common of the three kinds of paintbrush known in the park.

Further Reading:
Buchanan, Hayle, PhD. 1992. Wildflowers of Southwestern Utah, Bryce Canyon Natural History Association. Bryce Canyon, Utah.

Densmore, Frances. 1991. How Indians use Wild Plants for Food, Medicine and Crafts. Dover Publications.

Welsh, Treshow, and Moore. 1965. Common Utah Plants. Brigham Young University. Provo, Utah.

Did You Know?

Temple-like spires can be seen in the main amphitheater at Bryce

March 13, 1919: A Utah Joint Memorial passed legislation which read in part: We urge that the Congress of the United States set aside for the use and enjoyment of the people a suitable area embracing "Bryce's Canyon" as a national monument under the name: "Temple of the Gods National Monument." More...