• Colonial Boston Map, Faneuil Hall and the Charlestown Navy Yard skyline

    Boston

    National Historical Park Massachusetts

Public Transportation

The downtown visitor center (Faneuil Hall) is near the State Street stop of the Blue and Orange subway lines. Water transportation runs frequently between downtown Boston (Long Wharf) and the Charlestown Navy Yard. For more information about Boston's excellent public transportation system visit www.mbta.com

TO CHARLESTOWN NAVY YARD

Commuter Rail

From suburbs north and west of Boston, take the commuter rail to North Station, then walk approximately fifteen minutes to the Navy Yard. Exit the commuter rail station and turn left (onto Causeway Street). Walk about one block and a half, and take a left, walking over the Charlestown Bridge. At the end of the bridge, turn a right onto Chelsea Street, walk a block then turn right at the next intersection onto Warren Street followed immediately by a left onto Constitution Road, and go straight ahead through Gate 1 into the Charlestown Navy Yard. For suburbs south of Boston, take commuter rail to Back Bay station, then orange line subway to North Station. See directions from the subway below.

Subway

Take the subway, either the Green Line or Orange Line, to North Station. Exit the station and turn right (onto Causeway Street). Walk about one block and a half, and take a left, walking over the Charlestown Bridge. At the end of the bridge, turn a right onto Chelsea Street, walk a block then turn right at the next intersection onto Warren Street followed immediately by a left onto Constitution Road, and go straight ahead through Gate 1 into the Charlestown Navy Yard.

Water Shuttle

Take the water shuttle from Long Wharf, near the New England Aquarium and Marriott Long Wharf, to Charlestown Navy Yard. Boats run 7 days a week, and leave from Long Wharf on the hour and the half hour. Ten-minute boat ride.

Bus

From the Downtown Crossing area, take the 92 or 93 bus to the Navy Yard. Ten-minute bus ride from downtown.

Did You Know?

Colonial Boston Docks

Owning a shop to sell sewing supplies was one of the few occupations available to women in 18th century Boston. Many women were widowed by the French & Indian War and supported their families by working in the sewing trades. By 1770 over 70 shop-owning women in Boston were called "She-Merchants."