• Dedication of the Shaw Memorial 1897

    Boston African American

    National Historic Site Massachusetts

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Directions

Getting There

Plane

Logan International Airport is the major airport in Boston served by many national and international airlines. From the airport, the park can be reached by MBTA subway, taxi, rental or private vehicle.

Public Transportation
Park and ride facilities at MBTA subway (T) stations is an option to driving into the downtown area. MBTA subway stops closest to the site are the Park Street stop on the Red and Green subway lines, the Downtown Crossing stop on the Orange subway line, or the Bowdoin stop on the Blue subway line. Visit the MBTA web site for maps and information.

Car
From the Massachusetts Turnpike (Route 90), take the Copley Square exit to Stuart Street, then turn left on Route 28 (Charles Street) to Boston Common.

From Route 93, take Storrow Drive to the Copley Square exit, turn left on Beacon Street, right on Arlington Street, left on Boylston Street and left on Charles Street (Route 28).

If you are using GPS to reach the Shaw Memorial, we recommend entering the address of the Massachusetts State House, which is 24 Beacon Street, Boston, MA. The Shaw Memorial is located directly across from the State House.

Our partner, the Museum of African American History, is located at 46 Joy Street, Boston, MA.

Driving and parking are difficult on Beacon Hill. There are several parking garages in the vicinity within walking distance to the site.

Did You Know?

Attorney John Rock

Abolitionist/ Doctor/ Lawyer John S. Rock called the North Slope of Beacon Hill home. Rock became the first African American permitted to practice law in front of the Supreme Court in 1865.