• The Florida panther's steely gaze - NPS/RALPH ARWOOD

    Big Cypress

    National Preserve Florida

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • 2014 Zone 4 Closure

    Beginning at 12:01 am Monday, April 7, 2013, the Zone 4 airboat access within Big Cypress National Preserve will be closed due to low water conditions. More »

  • Turner River Closure

    Turner River is closed due to low water conditions. It is advised that visitors consider paddling Halfway Creek as an alternative. More »

  • Campground Closure

    Beginning January 27, through August 28, Burns Lake Campground will be closed to camping. It will still be accessible for day use and backcountry access, however. More »

  • Interstate 75 Mile Marker 63 Closure

    Beginning summer of 2013, the rest area and backcountry access at Mile Marker 63 will be closed due to construction. More »

Artist-In-Residence Program

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“Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone”
Thomas Moran, 1872

ARTISTS IN NATIONAL PARKS

Artists have had a long-standing impact on the formation, expansion and direction of our national parks. Painting the landscapes of the American West, visual artists like Thomas Moran, George Catlin and Albert Bierstadt focused attention on natural wonders in the western landscape, then unfamiliar to the eastern populace.

These visual records of early artists helped to stimulate the establishment of many of our national parks.

Today, painters continue to document national park landscapes with contemporary approaches and techniques. Writers, sculptors, musicians, composers, and other performing artists also draw upon the multifaceted quality of parks for inspiration.

These artists translate the national preserve's purpose, as a place of pleasure and conservation, into images, which bring others enjoyment and a deeper understanding of the parks many Americans may never visit.

Big Cypress National Preserve's Artist-In-Residence Program continues this tradition.

 
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Artwork  by past Artist in Residence Mark Goodenough.

ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE PROGRAM

The Artist-In-Residence Program at Big Cypress National Preserve offers professional writers, composers, and visual and performing artists the opportunity to pursue their artistic discipline while being surrounded by the preserve's inspiring landscape.

Selected artists stay in a dormitory setting, with each person having their own room, and sharing living room / dining room / kitchen and bathroom space. We do not accept pets in housing, nor do we allow for spouses within the housing area.

Requests for reimbursements for travel and other expenses will not be granted.

Big Cypress primarily looks for short-term (less than one month) and long-term (one to three months) residents during our wet (May through October) and dry (November through April) seasons. In August of each year a board of people will review the applicants for the following year and select the participants for each opportunity.

In total, the preserve accommodates four candidates from April through November. One short-term / wet-season, one long-term / wet-season, one short-term / dry-season and one long-term / dry-season.

Artwork Donations
In return, participating artists are required to donate two original pieces of artwork from, and representative of their residency in Big Cypress National Preserve. One is donated to the National Park Service and the other to the Friends of Big Cypress. Donated artwork must be received no later than one year after an artist's residency.

Artwork from visual artists should be archivally framed with glass and prepared for hanging before donation.

Artists are also required to provide the copyright for this artwork to the National Park Service. The National Park Service will not allow the commercial use of any donated artwork once it is selected and accessioned into the Preserve's permanent museum collection. Artwork may be used in exhibits and for educational purposes by Big Cypress National Preserve's nonprofit cooperating association for their products.

  1. The artist retains a royalty-free, nonexclusive use license under the copyright of the art.
  2. The National Park Service owns the artwork and the rights to reproduce it. Under those rights, the artist has a license to make use of the artwork for his or her purposes. When artists reproduce artwork for their own purposes, publication information will include the language: "This artwork was produced under the Artist-In-Residence Program at Big Cypress National Preserve."

These creative works are exhibited as frequently as possible and shared with the public through other appropriate means. Artwork not on display is stored in the preserve's secure, environmentally controlled museum storage facility.

Selection is based on artistic caliber, the artwork's ability to communicate the values and processes of Big Cypress National Preserve, and to meet the needs and scope of the preserve's art collection.

Ideally, both the NPS and Friends pieces will be photographed and published in an "Art of Big Cypress" publication.

 
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Molly Doctrow, a previous Artist in Residence, demonstrating her wood cut ink print art.

Public Presentations
Artists will present two 45-minute public programs during their residencies. This interaction can be tailored to an individual's medium, interest, and experience using only a few hours of one's stay. Programs can be demonstrations, talks, exploratory walks, or performances. Artists must provide their own supplies and equipment for these presentations. In addition, artists are requested to give public presentations in their communities about their residency experiences.

The Artist-In-Residence Program aspires to share with the public the scenic beauty and stories of Big Cypress National Preserve through the world of art.

 
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Please click here for more information about the National Park Service Artist-In-Residence Program.

Did You Know?

Researchers gather data from a bear that was removed as a nuisance.

Do not feed wildlife within the preserve. A "fed bear is a dead bear." This bear was fed and eventually became a threat to visitor safety. Nuisance wildlife is sometimes removed, but typically does not survive.