• The Florida panther's steely gaze - NPS/RALPH ARWOOD

    Big Cypress

    National Preserve Florida

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • 2014 Zone 4 Closure

    Beginning at 12:01 am Monday, April 7, 2013, the Zone 4 airboat access within Big Cypress National Preserve will be closed due to low water conditions. More »

  • Turner River Closure

    Turner River is closed due to low water conditions. It is advised that visitors consider paddling Halfway Creek as an alternative. More »

  • Campground Closure

    Beginning January 27, through August 28, Burns Lake Campground will be closed to camping. It will still be accessible for day use and backcountry access, however. More »

  • Interstate 75 Mile Marker 63 Closure

    Beginning summer of 2013, the rest area and backcountry access at Mile Marker 63 will be closed due to construction. More »

Turner River Unit Designated Trails

The Turner River Unit allows for off-road vehicle access by permitted swamp buggies and all-terrain vehicles. Dispersed camping continues to be allowed within the unit. You may drive your off-road vehicle to a location along a designated trail nearest the camping spot you prefer, park your off-road vehicle along the shoulder of the trail, in such a manner that does not impede travel by others, and carry your camping equipment to the site.

Effective 08/02/2013 the Turner River Unit has approximately 126 miles of designated primary trails and 49 miles of designated secondary trails.

To view the designated primary and secondary trails within the Turner River Unit click here. Map effective 08/02/2013.

Click here for a list of all trails in the unit that provides coordinates of start and end points, identifies whether it is open or closed, length of trail and destination.

Click here for a Google Earth file (.kml), or here for a .gdb file compatible with Garmin GPS units, of trails and facilities in the Turner River Unit of the Preserve.

Did You Know?

manatee

Mermaid sightings have been reported by sailors throughout history who often blamed the part-woman, part-fish beings for leading them astray. But folklore experts believe that what those sailors were seeing were not mermaids, but rather air-breathing manatees, or their dugong relatives. More...