• The Florida panther's steely gaze - NPS/RALPH ARWOOD

    Big Cypress

    National Preserve Florida

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Secondary Trail Closure

    As part of a settlement agreement with plaintiffs related to the designation of secondary off-road vehicle trails, all secondary off-road vehicle trails are closed until further environmental review and analysis can be completed. More »

  • October Off-Road Vehicle Advisory Committee Meeting Cancelled

    The National Park Service at Big Cypress National Preserve has cancelled the off-road Vehicle Advisory Committee meeting that was scheduled for Tuesday, October 7. More »

Places To Go

When you enter the national preserve be on Highway 41, this is where the fun begins. Not only is this roadway an experience in itself, it is the route to all places of interest at Big Cypress. All along the scenic drive there are scenic pull-offs, designed to give you wildlife viewing opportunities.

Depending on which direction you're coming from, you'll definitely want to get the latest information and recomendations at one of our visitor contact stations. Big Cypress National Preserve (from the east) is Oasis Visitor Center, Big Cypress Swamp Welcome Center (from the west). At these locations, you will be greeted by a National Park Ranger, who will welcome you and provide you with a map and other information about the national peserve.

In addition to a few stops along the way, plan a stop at the visitor centers, bookstores, and interesting exhibits. Kirby Storter Boardwalk is a great place to spend some time and you will see hiking trailheads all along the scenic drive.

If you want to visit virtually, get to know Big Cypress National Preserve by clicking on Nature & Science and History & Culture. Take a web trip to other National Park Service areas by visiting nps.gov and the Web Ranger site.

Did You Know?

Researchers gather data from a bear that was removed as a nuisance.

Do not feed wildlife within the preserve. A "fed bear is a dead bear." This bear was fed and eventually became a threat to visitor safety. Nuisance wildlife is sometimes removed, but typically does not survive.