• The Florida panther's steely gaze - NPS/RALPH ARWOOD

    Big Cypress

    National Preserve Florida

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  • 2014 Zone 4 Closure

    Beginning at 12:01 am Monday, April 7, 2013, the Zone 4 airboat access within Big Cypress National Preserve will be closed due to low water conditions. More »

  • Turner River Closure

    Turner River is closed due to low water conditions. It is advised that visitors consider paddling Halfway Creek as an alternative. More »

  • Campground Closure

    Beginning January 27, through August 28, Burns Lake Campground will be closed to camping. It will still be accessible for day use and backcountry access, however. More »

  • Interstate 75 Mile Marker 63 Closure

    Beginning summer of 2013, the rest area and backcountry access at Mile Marker 63 will be closed due to construction. More »

Preserve Generates 117 million in Local Economy

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Date: March 1, 2013
Contact: Bob DeGross, 239-695-1107

A 2011 study recently released by the National Park Service shows that the 941,393 visitors to Big Cypress National Preserve generated $117,467,000 of revenue in local communities. Additionally, the report shows that the preserve assists in supporting 1,891 jobs in the area.

"Big Cypress National Preserve is the backyard of South Florida and a wonderful place to learn about America's story," said preserve superintendent Pedro Ramos. "We attract visitors from across the U.S. and around the world who come here to experience the preserve and then spend time and money enjoying the services provided by our neighboring communities and getting to know this amazing part of the country. The National Park Service is proud to have been entrusted with the care of America's most treasured places and delighted that the visitors we welcome generate significant contributions to the local, state, and national economy."

The information on Big Cypress National Preserve is part of a peer-reviewed spending analysis of national park visitors across the country conducted by Michigan State University for the National Park Service. For 2011, that report shows $13 billion of direct spending by 279 million park visitors in communities within 60 miles of a national park. That visitor spending had a $30 billion impact on the entire U.S. economy and supported 252,000 jobs nationwide.
 
Most visitor spending supports jobs in lodging, food, and beverage service (63 percent) followed by recreation and entertainment (17 percent), other retail (11percent), transportation and fuel (7 percent) and wholesale and manufacturing (2 percent.)
 
To download the report visit www.nature.nps.gov/ socialscience/products.cfm#MGM and click on Economic Benefits to Local Communities from National Park Visitation, 2011.

The report includes information for visitor spending at individual parks and by state. In total the report shows that visitors to the four South Florida National Park Units - Big Cypress National Preserve, Everglades, Biscayne and Dry Tortugas National Parks - spend more than $305.3 million and support 4,716 jobs in South Florida.

To learn more about national parks in Florida and how the National Park Service works with communities to preserve local history, conserve the environment, and provide local recreation opportunities, go to www.nps.gov/FLORIDA 

Did You Know?

Alligator in the swamp.

HP Williams and Oasis Visitor Center are popular places to see alligators. The best time to see large congregations of alligators is typically January-May. Do not feed or approach wildlife.