• The Florida panther's steely gaze - NPS/RALPH ARWOOD

    Big Cypress

    National Preserve Florida

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  • Secondary Trail Closure

    Effective 8/1/2014, following the 60-day recreational ORV closure, only the designated primary trails in the backcountry will be open to recreational ORV use and access. All secondary trails will remain closed on an interim basis for an additional 60-days More »

Big Cypress Now Accepting Applications for 2014-2015 Artist-In-Residence Program

photo
Past Artist-In-Residence, Patricia Cummins, demonstrating her brush techniques to a captivated audience.
 

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Date: September 5, 2013
Contact: Christopher Derman, 239-695-1165

Artists have had a long-standing impact on the formation, expansion and direction of our national parks. Painting the landscapes of the American West, visual artists like Thomas Moran, George Catlin and Albert Bierstadt focused attention on natural wonders in the western landscape, then unfamiliar to the eastern populace.

Today, painters continue to document national park landscapes with contemporary approaches and techniques. Writers, sculptors, musicians, composers, and other performing artists also draw upon the multifaceted quality of parks for inspiration.

The Artist-In-Residence Program at Big Cypress National Preserve offers professional writers, composers, and visual and performing artists the opportunity to pursue their artistic discipline while being surrounded by the national preserve's inspiring landscape.

For more information about the Big Cypress Artist-In-Residence program, please use the following link:
http://www.nps.gov/bicy/supportyourpark/artist-in-residence-program.htm

For information on how to apply, please use the following link:
http://www.nps.gov/bicy/supportyourpark/artist-in-residence-program-how-to-apply.htm

Did You Know?

Researchers gather data from a bear that was removed as a nuisance.

Do not feed wildlife within the preserve. A "fed bear is a dead bear." This bear was fed and eventually became a threat to visitor safety. Nuisance wildlife is sometimes removed, but typically does not survive.