• The Florida panther's steely gaze - NPS/RALPH ARWOOD

    Big Cypress

    National Preserve Florida

There are park alerts in effect.
show Alerts »
  • 2014 Zone 4 Closure

    Beginning at 12:01 am Monday, April 7, 2013, the Zone 4 airboat access within Big Cypress National Preserve will be closed due to low water conditions. More »

  • Turner River Closure

    Turner River is closed due to low water conditions. It is advised that visitors consider paddling Halfway Creek as an alternative. More »

  • Campground Closure

    Beginning January 27, through August 28, Burns Lake Campground will be closed to camping. It will still be accessible for day use and backcountry access, however. More »

  • Interstate 75 Mile Marker 63 Closure

    Beginning summer of 2013, the rest area and backcountry access at Mile Marker 63 will be closed due to construction. More »

Environmental Factors

5SunriseMist-(3)-Credit-Richard-Eskin
"Sunrise Mist"
Richard Eskin
 

For countless centuries, the landscape and associated plant and animal life of Big Cypress and the Greater Everglades Ecosystem have been shaped and altered by the forces of nature. Flood, drought, hurricanes, fire, frost, have had their influence. Those same environmental factors continue their molding and sculpting today, though often on a time scale that seems to make change invisible.

In more recent times, the interactions of people and the landscape have influenced the landscape and the life that depends on it. Swampland has been drained, cleared and cultivated, roads have been constructed, and homesteads established. Wildfires were stopped and non-native vegetation was introduced. Pollutants have also degraded water quality. Non-native plants and animals, which have arrived in this country from distant parts of the world, threaten to have substantial impacts on the Preserve's swamp ecosystem.

National Preserve staff and cooperating scientists are working to better understand these environmental factors and to find ways to manage those that are adversely impacting the condition of preserve resources.

Did You Know?

A great white heron scratches its neck. Notice the color of the legs.

The great white heron is very similar to the great white egret. However, look closely and you will see that the heron has yellow legs, while the egret has black legs. The great white heron is found only in south Florida in the United States. It can also be found on several caribbean islands.