• The Florida panther's steely gaze - NPS/RALPH ARWOOD

    Big Cypress

    National Preserve Florida

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  • Annual 60-Day ORV Closure for Wheeled Vehicles

    Beginning at 12:01 am Monday, June 2, the annual 60-day recreational ORV closure for all units of the Preserve that allow for wheeled ORV access will begin. The closure will be lifted on Friday, August 1. More »

  • Campground Closure

    All campgrounds but Midway and the loop in the Bear Island Campground are closed through August 29. More »

  • Interstate 75 Mile Marker 63 Closure

    Beginning summer of 2013, the rest area and backcountry access at Mile Marker 63 will be closed due to construction. More »

Teacher-Ranger-Teachers

Heron-Stand-Off-Activity---NBG
Kids playing "heron stand-off" with a teacher-ranger-teacher.
 

The Teacher-to-Ranger-to-Teacher program is an extended professional development opportunity for teachers to connect with national parks through a summer work experience. Teachers selected as teacher-rangers spend the summer performing various duties depending on their interests and the needs of the Preserve. The Teacher-Ranger-Teacher program allows parks to reach teachers and students who have had little or no experience with a national park setting and provides opportunities to explore the relevance that National Park Service sites can have in their lives.

Big Cypress Teacher-Ranger-Teacher Program
Teachers selected as a Teacher-Ranger-Teacher spend six weeks working side-by-side with park rangers performing various duties such as developing and presenting interpretive programs for the general public, staffing the visitor center desk, reviewing existing or developing new curriculum-based education materials, or undertaking special projects. The Teacher-Ranger-Teacher program provides a stipend and professional development credits.

Once they return to their schools, teacher-rangers bring their national preserve knowledge and experiences into the school and classrooms throughout the school year to engage students, faculty, and staff in lessons and activities that relate to Big Cypress National Preserve and other National Park Service sites.

POTENTIAL PARK EXPERIENCES
Teacher-Ranger-Teacher assignments and projects depend upon the individual selected and current Preserve projects. Training in Big Cypress National Preserve natural and cultural history and the National Park Service mission will be provided. Duties may include preparing and presenting public programs; assisting with field research; evaluating school programs, teacher workshops, and curriculum materials; or providing community outreach programs.

 

BENEFITS
To Teacher-Rangers

  • Enhance their curriculum in multiple content areas
  • Create personal connection with national parks
  • Gain access to a wide array of teaching resources and tools
  • Obtain new knowledge and skills by working with national preserve staff

To Students

  • Provide an opportunity to connect to their nation's heritage in new and creative ways
  • Learn about the possibilities for volunteering and paid employment with the National Park Service
  • Receive new tools and resources for exploring natural and cultural history through national parks

To Big Cypress National Preserve

  • Opportunity to reach new or under-served audiences through innovative, engaging programs
  • Build a network of enthusiastic, knowledgeable educators who are able to teach their students and colleagues about the significance of national parks and heritage conservation
  • Enrich the national preserve visitor experience through the programming and visitor service offered by the teacher-ranger
 
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2013 Teacher-Ranger-Teacher Emily Louwsma standing next to an endangered ghost orchid.

NPS

HOW TO APPLY
All applications must include the following:

  1. Resume
  2. Cover letter
  3. Three references
  4. Completed application

Applications mut be emailed to e-mail us by May 13, 2013.

Click here for an application.

Did You Know?

manatee

Mermaid sightings have been reported by sailors throughout history who often blamed the part-woman, part-fish beings for leading them astray. But folklore experts believe that what those sailors were seeing were not mermaids, but rather air-breathing manatees, or their dugong relatives. More...