• Breathtaking autumn colors in Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

    Bering Land Bridge

    National Preserve Alaska

Volcanoes / Lava Flows

Lost Jim Lava Flow
The Lost Jim Lava Flow serves as a habitat for dozens of species of lichens, plants, and animals.
NPS Photo
 
The Lost Jim Lava flow is one of the youngest and largest lava flows near the Arctic Circle in the world. The Lost Jim Lava Flow is an 88 square mile pahoehoe flow of olivine basalt. A pahoehoe flow is a flow where the top layer of lava cools and the bottom layer still flows. Pahoehoe lava looks like wrinkles with fast flowing lava beneath it. The Lost Jim Lava Flow is a recent flow; it is young in geologic time, only 1,000 to 2,000 years old. It ranges in thickness from 10 to about 150 feet. The lava flow consists of 75 vents (mostly small cones) surrounded by lava flows. Cones generally produced a single flow, and range in height from 3-30m. The largest of these cones, the Lost Jim Cone, in the eastern part of the flow, stands 30m high.

Did You Know?

A wolverine wandering around in the snow

Mammals living in the Bering Land Bridge National Preserve include the grizzly bear, musk ox, reindeer, wolf, wolverine, foxes, and smaller species.