• Breathtaking autumn colors in Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

    Bering Land Bridge

    National Preserve Alaska

Curriculum Materials

  • Aerial view of the village of Elim in Northwest Alaska

    Featured Materials

    Who Uses the Land?

    Who has used the land of the Seward Peninsula over the last 10,000 years? Explore »

  • Fuzzy red and orange willow blossoms stick out from a green willow plant

    Featured Materials

    Views of Climate Change in Alaska, the Arctic, and Beyond

    Climate change is occurring globally and everyone can have an impact in slowing its effects! Explore »

  • Hiker takes in the view of the Alaskan tundra

    Featured Materials

    Climate Quest!

    A global journey of discovery through the Barefoot Books World Atlas App for iPads Explore »

  • A crab on a rocky beach

    Featured Materials

    There's No Place Like Home

    Explore different kinds of animal homes in the ocean, and learn how to take care of them! Explore »

  • Patchy sea ice and clouds in vivid blue colors as seen from an airplane

    Featured Materials

    Inupiaq Sea Ice Language

    How many words do you know for talking about frozen water? Explore »

  • Lesson 3: Washing Away the Earth

    Featured Materials

    Erosion: Washing Away the Earth

    How are erosion and climate change connected, and how do they shape our Arctic environment? Explore »

  • Caribou are a vital part of the food web

    Featured Materials

    The Missing Link: Food Webs on the Seward Peninsula

    Every living creature is part of a bigger web. Let's find out how it's all linked together! Explore »

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  • Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

    Who Uses the Land?

    Who Uses the Land?

    The earliest evidence of land use harkens back to the Bering Land Bridge, when the first human inhabitants of this continent crossed over from Asia over 10,000 years ago. This land use continues to today, with many different groups competing for rights to use the land. The various types of usage have not always been beneficial.

  • Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

    Inupiaq Sea Ice Language

    Inupiaq Sea Ice Language

    Bering Land Bridge National Preserve protects an expanse of land remaining from the prehistoric “land bridge,” also known as Beringia, which spanned from modern-day Asia to North America over 12,000 years ago. The bridge was up to 1,000 miles wide, and was a land mass that allowed for the exchange of human, flora, and fauna populations between continents. In this unit, students explore Beringia—the movement of living things, geology and special places inside the Bering Land Bridge Preserve.

  • Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

    Views of Climate Change in Alaska, the Arctic, and Beyond

    Views of Climate Change in Alaska, the Arctic, and Beyond

    Climate change is occurring globally, however some of the effects are more noticeable in certain regions of the world, like Alaska and the Arctic. Everyone can have an impact in slowing the effects of climate change.

  • Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

    Climate Quest!

    Climate Quest!

    Climate Quest is a fun-filled journey around the world! It will give the class a chance to visit and see some amazing things….and to get a glimpse of how the world is changing. The goal during the quest will be to gather clues to see what is going on out there, why things are changing and what we might be able to do to help!

  • Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

    There's No Place Like Home

    There's No Place Like Home

    Homes can be in warm or cold climates, on land or in the ocean, but they all have share certain features and requirements to help us survive and live well. Let’s take good care of our homes…always!

  • Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

    Wind Dynamics and Forests

    Wind Dynamics and Forests

    Changes in vegetation from human activity have led to significant climatic consequences. How does this happen, and what types of interactions are taking place? Students will set up a model forest to observe changes and their causes.

  • Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

    The Missing Link: Food Webs on the Seward Peninsula

    The Missing Link: Food Webs on the Seward Peninsula

    Every living creature is part of a bigger web. Each creature in a particular ecosystem (or area) is dependent on all the other creatures in that ecosystem in many different ways. When one piece of the web gets removed, the whole ecosystem is altered.

  • Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

    Erosion: Washing Away the Earth

    Erosion: Washing Away the Earth

    Erosion can be a major issue. It is caused by a number of factors, both manmade and natural. The effects of erosion are very evident on Arctic coastal villages that are experiencing storm surges and no longer have the added protection of longer lasting sea ice. Research indicates that both the storm surges and lost of sea ice are the result of climate change.

  • Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

    The Power of Water

    The Power of Water

    Water shapes our everyday lives in many ways. We use it to cook. We use it to bathe. We depend on it for food. When it rains or storms it also affects our lives. Let's find out what role water plays in climate change!

  • Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

    Things are Heating Up

    Things are Heating Up

    Energy is transferred through three different methods: convection, conduction and radiation. These three methods impact the earth’s temperature and also how weather patterns affect us.

Did You Know?

Two male musk oxen budding heads in the middle of the Kougarok Road in Nome, Alaska.

Muskox were once extinct on the Alaskan Seward Peninsula, but were reintroduced in 1970. They are now thriving on the Peninsula, even in the Bering Land Bridge National Preserve.