• Breathtaking autumn colors in Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

    Bering Land Bridge

    National Preserve Alaska

Be A Junior Ranger

Children standing in line with their arms out to their sides.

Junior Rangers stand in line from shortest to widest wing span. The children were comparing their "wing span" to the wingspan of some very popular birds.

NPS Photo - Rebecca Brisco-Rhone

Become a Junior Ranger this summer! Join a park ranger for eight weeks of activities, art projects and discovery walks that explore the natural and cultural history of the area. Discover the work of the reindeer herders, go on a scavenger hunt for cool native plants, create your own cultural garment, work as an archaeologist on your own dig site and more!

For children 6 to 12 years old, to sign-up to become a Junior Ranger stop by the Interpretive Center on Front Street, Sitnasuak building and see Jennifer Thelen or call 907-443-2522 or 1-800- 471-2352.

If you don't live in Alaska, you can download a PDF of the Junior Ranger book (PDF 2.62 MB) or request one by e-mail. To view the book you will need Adobe Acrobat Reader found here, it is free. Thank you to National Park Foundation for supporting the publication of the new Junior Ranger book and the Alaska Natural History Association for supporting the Junior Ranger Kits.

If you're looking for a little extra fun, download the Junior Paleontologist book (PDF, 9.57mb), published by the National Park Service, and send it in completed to Bering Land Bridge for your special Junior Paleontologist badge!

 
Color image of the Bering Land Bridge Junior Ranger patch, blue background, with a brown woolly mammoth and a green map of the Seward Peninsula, Alaska with Bering Land Bridge National Preserve outlined in the Seward Peninsula map.
Junior Rangers who complete enough activities in the booklet during the eight week Junior Ranger Program or on their own will receive a patch for their work.
NPS Image

Did You Know?

Two archeologist from the National Park Service digging in test pits in Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

Archeological discoveries on the Bering Land Bridge National Preserve date human inhabitants to 9,000 years ago.