• Breathtaking autumn colors in Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

    Bering Land Bridge

    National Preserve Alaska

Bridge to the Future 1

About This Blog

What are we learning today about Bering Land Bridge? This is a blog highlighting some of the work being done by archaeologists, wildlife biologists, ecologists, and rangers that help us understand and care for the 2.7 million acres in Bering Land Bridge National Preserve.

A Muskox on the Move

September 03, 2013 Posted by: Dr. Layne Adams

The curious movements of a collared muskox on the Seward Peninsula

 

Ikpekapalooza

June 20, 2013 Posted by: Marci Johnson

Three upcoming field projects in Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

 

A "Mammoth" Discovery!

December 17, 2012 Posted by: Jon Hardes

Blog #6: Woolly mammoth remains found in Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

 

The Space Between Land and Sea

August 13, 2012 Posted by: Celeste Brooke Carney

Blog #4 On developing a long-term monitoring program for coastal lagoons

 

Meet the Expert: Permafrost

August 13, 2012 Posted by: Celeste Brooke Carney

Blog #5 Join a live chat with ecologist Dave Swanson about thawing permafrost

 

Creatures from the Black Lagoon

July 25, 2012 Posted by: Stacia Backensto

Blog #3 An update from Cowpack Lagoon

 

From Wales to Point Hope with ShoreZone

July 23, 2012 Posted by: Marci Johnson

Blog #2 The Kotzebue Sound ShoreZone imaging project is underway

 

Seas of Caribou Waves of Insects

July 17, 2012 Posted by: Marci Johnson

Blog #1 Wildlife biologist Kyle Joly's updates on the Western Arctic caribou herd

 
 
The Bridge to the Future blog is a selection of posts related to Bering Land Bridge National Preserve taken from the Western Arctic National Parklands' Running Herd blog.

Did You Know?

An inactive 2005 Bilge Creek Fire.

A lightning strike ignites a fire in the preserve. The fire burns for a week and then rain puts it out. In about 7 years, a visitor could walk on the burned site having no idea there once was a fire under his or her feet. This speedy site re-vegetation is typical of tundra fire adapted ecosystems.