• Long House in autumn

    Bandelier

    National Monument New Mexico

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  • Access by Shuttle Bus Only

    Through October 27, 2014 all access to the most visited part of the park, Frijoles Canyon, will be via a mandatory shuttle bus from the nearby community of White Rock from 9 AM - 3 PM daily. Private cars may drive in before 9 AM or after 3 PM. More »

Summer and Migratory Birds Continued

redwing blackbird

Photo by Sally King

RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD (Agelaius phoeniceus)
Wingspan 18"
Common along the Rio Grande in the summer, less common in spring and fall. Best place to see is marshy areas along the Rio but watch for rattlesnakes.
 
Young Violet-Green Swallow

Fledgling Swallow

VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW (Tachycineta thalassina)
Wingspan 13.5"
Common in the riparian and mesatop areas. Frequently seen nesting in Cottonwood Picnic Area and along the Nature Trail.
 
swallow at hole
Adult Female Violet-Green Swallow at nest
Photos by Sally King
 
ash throated flycatcher

Photo by Sally King

ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER (Myiarchus cinerascens)
Wingspan 12"
Common in the summer, and less so in the spring, especially in the riparian areas.
 
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

NPS Photo by Sally King

BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER (Polioptila caerulea)
Wingspan 6"
Somewhat uncommon but can be seen in the park especially on the brushy mesas. Best trails to see them include Frijolito Loop Trail and Frey Trail.
 
Say's Phoebe
SAY'S PHOEBE (Sayornis saya)
Wingspan 13"
Common in the riparian areas of the park. Has been seen along the Main Loop and Nature Trails.
 
rock wren 4

Photo by Sally King

ROCK WREN (Salpinctes obsoletus)
Wingspan 9"
Relatively common in the canyons especially Frijoles Canyon. Often seen in Tyuonyi or at Long House especially in spring and fall.
 
Virginia's Warbler

Photo by Sally King

VIRGINIA'S WARBLER (Vermivora virginiae)
Wingspan 7.5"
Common especially in the riparian areas.
 
flycatcher

NPS Photo by Sally King

OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER (Contopus cooperi)
Wingspan 13"
Uncommon but has been seen on the Main Loop Trail.
 
Peregrine Falcon

Photo by Sally King

PEREGRINE FALCON (Falco peregrinus)
Wingspan 41"
Not common but has been seen and heard in the monument.
 
peregrine flight
A peregrine falcon soars over Frijoles Canyon.
photo by sally king
 
yellow-breasted chat

Photo by Sally King

YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT (Icteria virens)
Wingspan 9.75"
Relatively common along the Rio Grande.
 
white crowned sparrow

photo by sally king

WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW (Zonotrichia leucophrys)
Wingspan 9.5"
Common some years during migration.
 
Bullock's Oriole

photo by sally king

BULLOCK'S ORIOLE (Icterus bullockii)
Wingspan 12"
Uncommon but have been seen along the Rio Grande or in Frijoles Canyon.
 
Wilson's Warbler

photo by sally king

WILSON'S WARBLER (Wilsonia pusilla)
Wingspan 7"
Common in the riparian zones. Easiest to see in spring.
 
orange crowned warbler 2

photo by sally king

ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER (Vermivora celata)
Wingspan 7.25"
Common in the riparian areas. Easiest to see in the spring.

 
Killdeer with eggs

photo by sally king

KILLDEER (Charadrius vociferus)
24" wingspan
Uncommon but has been seen along the Rio Grande and at the park sewer lagoons. More common on the adjacent Valles Caldera.
 
Least Sandpiper

photo by sally king

LEAST SANDPIPER (Calidris minutilla)
13" wingspan
Uncommon but has been seen at the park sewer lagoons and at mountain ponds, mostly during migration.

 
Wilson's Phalaropes

photo by sally king

WILSON'S PHALAROPE (Phalaropus tricolor)
Rare but has been seen at the park's sewer lagoons during migration.
 
Common Nighthawk

photo by sally king

COMMON NIGHTHAWK (Chordeiles minor)
Wingspan 24"
Uncommon but can be found on the dry mesatops such as Frijolito Loop Trail or the Burro Trail. Active mostly at night and well camouflaged for roosting on the ground.
 
Scaled Quail

photo by sally king

SCALED QUAIL (Callipepla squamata)
Wingspan 14"
Rare in Bandelier but has been seen near Tsankawi and the nearby town of White Rock.
 

Did You Know?

Mule Deer Fawn

Mule deer fawns only keep their spots for the first several months of life. These spots provide camouflage for the young animals when their mothers must leave them to feed.