• Bandelier Short-horned Lizard

    Bandelier

    National Monument New Mexico

Identification of Mammals

abert 3

photo by sally king

ABERT'S SQUIRREL (Sciurus aberti)
Common in any area where there are lots of Ponderosa pines. Can be seen on the Main Loop Trail, Alcove House Trail, Falls Trail, and Cottonwood Picnic Area. Can have a tendency to beg for food. PLEASE DON'T FEED THEM. Don't get too close. They can bite.

Printable Abert's Squirrel Fact Sheet (PDF)

 
Red Squirrel

Photo by Sally King

RED SQUIRREL (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus)
Common in the higher elevations of the park. Can be seen on the Alamo Boundary, Ski, or Cerro Grande Trails. Rarely along the Main Loop Trail in Frijoles Canyon. Have a unique bark when they feel their territory is in danger.
 
Rock Squirrel

NPS Photo by Sally King

ROCK SQUIRREL (Spermophilus variegatus)
Very common throughout the park. Hibernates in winter but can be seen on warm spring days sunning itself on rocks near Long House on the Main Loop Trail. Some tendency to beg for food. Please do not feed them.
 
Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel

NPS Photo by Sally King

GOLDEN-MANTLED GROUND SQUIRREL (Spermophilus lateralis)
Common in the higher elevations of the park. Occasionally in canyons. Often seen on Cerro Grande, Alamo Boundary, and Ski Trails.
 
Colorado Chipmunk

NPS Photo by Sally King

COLORADO CHIPMUNK (Eutamis quadriwittatus)
Common in the canyons, lower elevations, and along Rio Grande. Can be seen in Cottonwood Picnic Grounds and on the Falls Trail.
 
Least Chipmunk

NPS Photo by Sally King

LEAST CHIPMUNK (Eutamis minimus)
Common in higher elevations of the park. Can be seen on Alamo Boundary, Cerro Grande, and Ski Trails.
 
Pocket Gopher

NPS Photo by Sally King

POCKET GOPHER (Thomomys spp)
Common throughout the park. Burrow underground looking for food and can be very damaging to archeological sites. Can easily be seen along the Main Loop Trail or in front of the visitor center.
 
Mountain Lion

NPS Photo by Dale Coker

MOUNTAIN LION (Felix concolor)
Uncommon but may be seen in the park, usually along or crossing roadways. Each mountain lion requires a fair bit of territory so numbers within the park are probably small.
 
Bobcat

Photo by Ernesto Burciaga

BOBCAT (Lunx rufus)
Uncommon but can be seen usually along or crossing park roadways.
 
Mule Deer

NPS Photo by Sally King

MULE DEER (Ococoileus hemionus)
Extremely common throughout the park year-round. Very often seen on the Main Loop Trail, entrance road, and Alcove House Trail.
 
Elk

NPS Photo by Sally King

ELK (Cervus canadenis)
Common in the park in the winter on the mesatops and rarely in the canyons. Can be seen on the entrance road.
 
Black Bear

Photo by Ernesto Burciaga

BLACK BEAR (Ursus americanus)
Uncommon and rarely seen. Most often seen during dry years when lack of food forces them closer to the developed areas in Frijoles Canyon. Be sure to use bear-proof containers so our bears don't become used to eating human food.

Printable Black Bear Fact Sheet (PDF)

 
Coyote

NPS Photo by Sally King

COYOTE (Canis latrans)
Fairly common throughout the park. Rarely seen and then most often along roadways.

Printable Coyote Fact Sheet (PDF)

 
Gray Fox

NPS Photo by Sally King

GRAY FOX (Urocyon cinereoargenteus)
Uncommon but can be seen along the Main Loop Trail on occasion.
 
Big-eared Bat

NPS Photo by Sally King

TOWNSEND'S BIG-EARED BAT (Plecotus townsendii)
Uncommon and even more rarely seen. One of thirteen species of bats found in the park.
 
Big Brown Bat

NPS Photo by Sally King

BIG BROWN BAT (Eptesicus fuscus)
Uncommon and even more rarely seen. One of 13 species of bats found in the park.

 
Cottontail Rabbit

photo by sally king

AUDUBON'S DESERT COTTONTAIL (Sylvilagus auduboni)
Very common throughout most areas of the park. Rarely seen except in the early morning or early evening.
 
Common Muskrat

NPS Photo by Sally King

COMMON MUSKRAT (Ondatra zibethicus)
Uncommon but can be seen in marshy areas along the Rio Grande.
 
American Badger

photo by sally king

AMERICAN BADGER (Taxidea taxus)
Uncommon but seen in grassy meadows in some higher elevation areas of the park and more common in the nearby Valles Caldera National Preserve.

Printable American Badger Fact Sheet (PDF)

 
Raccoon

photo by sally king

MEXICAN RACCOON (Procyon lotor)
Common in park but most active at night so rarely seen.
 
American Pika

photo by sally king

AMERICAN PIKA (Ochotona princeps)
These animals are closely related to rabbits. Until recently their presence in the park was undocumented. In their southern range, pika live in isolated communities at high elevations. In Bandelier, there are several small colonies located in specific geologic areas in the highest elevations. Pika live in cold environments and these isolated communities may be in jeopardy due to climate change.

Printable American Pika Fact Sheet (PDF)
 
Long-tailed Weasel

photo by sally king

LONG-TAILED WEASEL (Mustela frenata)
Uncommon but has been seen in the higher elevations of the park such as Cerro Grande Route. Secretive and rarely seen.

 
Ringtail images

photos by sally king

RINGTAIL (Bassariscus astutus)
Common in the park but rarely seen. Almost always active only at night, sleeps in den during the day.
 
pinyon deermouse

photo by sally king

PINYON DEERMOUSE (Peromyscus truei)
Common in the pinyon-juniper woodland but rarely seen.
 
North American Deermouse

photo by sally king

NORTH AMERICAN DEERMOUSE (Peromyscus maniculatus)
Common throughout the park but rarely seen.

 
silver haired bat 2

photo by sally king

SILVER-HAIRED BAT (Lasionycteris noctivagans) Common in the park but rarely seen. Nocturnal consumer of insects.

Did You Know?

Tyuonyi Pueblo

It is estimated that Tyuonyi Pueblo had 400 rooms but only 100 people lived there. Many of the rooms were used mostly for storage of food and pens for turkeys.