• Badlands formations against the blue sky; photo by Rikk Flohr

    Badlands

    National Park South Dakota

Summer Intern Adventures

About This Blog

Follow the adventures of the 2014 Badlands Youth Intern Program. Nine high school students, two teachers, and one education specialist embark on a summer of learning, working, and growing together. What's the goal? Inspire the next generation to pursue careers with the National Park Service. Come along and get involved. You might just decide to volunteer or work for the NPS too.

Environmental Justice

August 08, 2014 Posted by: Dakota McCoy & Julie Johndreau

The park is working to improve environmental justice and inspire the next generation of park stewards by involving diverse youth from different communities. A partnership with the Boys & Girls Club of America is helping us achieve this goal.

 

Nathan's Reflections on Fossils in the Badlands

July 22, 2014 Posted by: Nathan Wooden Knife

The story of the saber cat's discovery and the importance of visitor fossil finds in Badlands National Park. One intern's experience with the ancient life of the Badlands.

 

Emerald Pretty Weasel, Medical and Career Training

July 09, 2014 Posted by: Emerald Pretty Weasel

Emerald shares a very personal story about why career training at the park has meant so much to her.

 

Dwan Wilcox, Two events with NPS Partners

July 06, 2014 Posted by: Dwan Wilcox

Dwan posesses natural gifts in resource interpretation. In this post, she recounts her experience sharing knowledge and working for envionmental justice with both the Montana Conservation Corps and the Boys and Girls Club of Ellsworth Airforce Base.

 

Jayden Dull Knife, Reflections on Environmental Stewardship

July 02, 2014 Posted by: Jayden Dull Knife

Jayden Dull Knife reflects on his experience at the Red Shirt Table clean up.

 

Youth and Social Media

June 29, 2014 Posted by: Dakota McCoy

The National Park Service defines "youth" as 25 years old and younger. Our twenty-somethings are the key to engaging the next generation. In this blog post, park ranger Dakota McCoy explains her work at staying connected to teens and bridging the gap from "cool" youth culture to the meanings of national parks.

 

Joseph One Skunk, Living & Learning at a Park

June 27, 2014 Posted by: Joseph One Skunk

Joseph One Skunk was invited to apply to our summer intern program in 2014. He has made lots of new friends and feels fortunate to be a part of the program.

 

Earl Henry Lamont, Aspiring Paleontologist

June 24, 2014 Posted by: Earl Henry Lamont

Sixteen year old park guide Earl Henry Lamont has developed a keen interest in paleontology. The intern program provides professional job shadowing opportunities in the hopes of inspiring the next generation to pursue related careers.

 

Dwan Wilcox, A Young Voice Speaks from Pine Ridge Indian Reservation

June 23, 2014 Posted by: Dwan Wilcox

Dwan Wilcox has been an volunteer and Park Guide at Badlands National Park for over a year. In that time, her leadership skills have advanced and she looks to a bright future, for herself and for her community.

 

Nathan Wooden Knife, Age 16, Experienced Park Ranger

June 20, 2014 Posted by: Nathan Wooden Knife

Nathan Wooden Knife has worked as a park volunteer since he was twelve years old. Now that he is sixteen years old, he has moved into a Park Guide position. Nathan will wear the ranger uniforms and help our visitors all summer. Nathan describes the program in this blog post.

 

A Teacher's Perspective

June 17, 2014 Posted by: Josh Menke

The successes of the intern program are truly due to park ranger/teacher Josh Menke's efforts. From day one last summer, he started recruiting young leaders from his school. Now, Josh directs the Badlands youth intern program.

 

What Have I Done?

June 13, 2014 Posted by: Julie Johndreau

With two years of experience, successes, and failures behind us, we look to the future. The 2014 Tribal Youth Intern Program has officially started. What do we do first? Set goals, get trained, and, oh yeah, get out there and learn everything we can about Badlands National Park. --An Introductory Blog Post by Julie Johndreau, Education Specialist, Badlands National Park

 

Did You Know?

The white water of Sage Creek

Available water in the badlands is always loaded with sediment. Cloudy and milky white in appearance, the water contains particles that carry a slight charge of electricity. The particles repel each other, instead of settling to the bottom. Early visitors found the water unsuitable for drinking.