• Great Kiva with Walls of West Ruin

    Aztec Ruins

    National Monument New Mexico

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  • Museum Closed Starting October 27, 2014

    The Aztec Ruins museum will be closed starting Monday, October 27, 2014 to prepare for new exhibits to be installed in April 2015. The visitor center, video, and self-guided trail will remain open.

Bookstore

photo of the bookstore at Aztec Ruins National Monument

WNPA bookstore at Aztec Ruins NM

Western National Parks & Monuments Association maintains a bookstore at Aztec Ruins National Monument. The bookstore is located within the Visitor Center at the Monument. One may purchase a wide range of books, including local and regional research, guide books for natural & cultural resources, Southwestern cookbooks, archeological-based novels, American Indian literature, and multi-language children's books. Also available are DVDs, music, T-shirts, posters, postcards & note cards, and coffee mugs. Special items available, found only at this location, are miniature replicas of pottery found at the site. WNPA returns a portion of the profits to support interpretive and resource management programs. These and more items may be ordered by contacting the store manager at (505) 334-6174 ext. 229 or azru@wnpa.org.

 
DVD cover

Aztec Ruins: Footprints of the Past DVD

Aztec Ruins: Footprints of the Past DVD by the National Park Service.

The complex story of the people of Aztec Ruins National Monument is brought to life in the stunning cinematography of this beautiful and informative film. Shown regularly in the park visitor center, this DVD is the perfect way to share Aztec Ruins with family and friends.

 
Photo of the cover of "A History of the Ancient Southwest."

A History of the Ancient Southwest

A History of the Ancient Southwest by Stephen H. Lekson.

According to archaeologist Stephen H. Lekson, much of what we think we know about the Southwest has been compressed into conventions and classifications and orthodoxies. This book challenges and reconfigures these accepted notions by telling two parallel stories, one about the development, personalities, and institutions of Southwestern archaeology and the other about interpretations of what actually happened in the ancient past.

 
Photo of the cover of "Chaco's Northern Prodigies"

Chaco's Northern Prodigies

Chaco's Northern Prodigies edited by Paul Reed

In the late eleventh and early twelfth centuries, the ancient pueblo sites of Aztec and Salmon in the Middle San Juan region rapidly emerged as population and political centers during the closing stages of Chaco's ascendancy. Some archaeologists have attributed the development of these centers to migration and colonization by people from Chaco Canyon. Others have suggested that the so-called Chacoan 'system' was largely the result of emulation of Chacoan characteristics by local groups in outlying areas. Research over the last five years in the Middle San Juan suggests that both of these processes were operating.

 
Photo of cover of "People of the Moon."

People of the Moon

People of the Moon by W. Michael Gear and Kathleen O'Neal Gear

The authors Gear began their First North Americans series of prehistoric historical novels in 1990 with People of the Wolf. This thirteenth installment is one of the best novels in the series. The Gears have consistently captured early Native American life with precision, detail, and narrative excitement, but in Moon they reveal their skills to even sharper effect. The geographical locale this time is an area that will become northern New Mexico and southern Colorado; the Chaco Anasazi hold sway over the region and have done so for 200 years. As is the case with all conquering people--and almost certainly guaranteed by the people they have conquered--maintenance of suppression proves difficult.

 
miniature olla

Miniature olla replica

Miniature Replica Pottery

Available only at the bookstore at Aztec Ruins National Monument are miniature replicas of 10 pieces of pottery found on exhibit at the Monument. Each piece is hand made and painted by artist William Perry.

 
Photo of the cover of The Lost Kachina

The Lost Kachina

The Lost Kachina by Heather Irbinskas, illustrated by Robert Albert.

A coloring book based on the children's picture book of the same title. A Hopi kachina doll is purchased by a schoolteacher, but when she retires, he is left on a shelf feeling unappreciated and misunderstood. A new teacher who is from the Hopi tribe finds the doll and teaches his class how to understand the kachina and the beauty and harmony in nature that he represents.

 
Photo of Ancestral Puebloans DVD

Ancestral Puebloans DVD

For over 1000 years the Ancestral Puebloans lived in the Four Corners country and then they moved on. What they left behind are massive stone cities on mesa tops, in natural caves and along sheer canyon walls. This splendid National Park Service film captures the serene, awesome, legendary spirit of these dwellings at Chaco Canyon, Betatakin, Mesa Verde, Canyon de Chelly, Aztec, and other sites in the San Juan system.

Did You Know?

Photo of Earl Morris house

The Visitor Center was once the home of Earl Halstead Morris, the archeologist who first excavated Aztec Ruins. He recycled some original timbers from the ruins in the building. You can still see some of these beams in the ceiling.