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THE NORTHEAST >> SEASONED SURVIVORS EXPLORING THE UNKNOWN TELLING ARTIFACTS
   

Exploration of the Northeast was like settling islands in the Pacific—relying entirely on one’s own ingenuity. It would have been like Lewis and Clark without Sacagawea's help. The first inhabitants created mental maps and ways of organizing knowledge about animals, landforms, vegetation, and sources of stone and other raw materials.

The rivers ran fast with melting ice, except in winter when the people could cross almost anywhere. The mountain slopes were deep in snow, covering the bedrock used to manufacture tools. Navigating the many ponds and swamps required circuitous travel. The newcomers found that gravel spreads, which absorbed the sun’s heat, were among the few dry places to camp.

Over time, leafy trees from the south invaded the pine and spruce forests. Grasses filled clearings where squirrels, deer, and turkey found food. The Paleoindians cherished the many kinds of berries at the edge of the woods, competing for the morsels with colorful birds.

  (photo) Woman sitting in pit taking notes with trowel nearby.
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Map of North America with glacier.

Recording data at Hidden Creek, a Connecticut Paleoindian site.

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