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Archeology for Interpreters > 6. What Are Our Personal and Professional Responsibilities?

Introduction

[photo] A park interpreter and archeologist discuss excavated units at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. (NPS)

A park interpreter and archeologist discuss excavated units at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. (NPS)

Both interpreters and archeologists should be aware of the range of our responsibilities to visitors, associated communities, and the resources themselves. Interpreters know how important it is to consider the audience and how best to communicate. Archeologists are aware of the demanding ethical standards of their profession. Together, they can design effective interpretation that promotes stewardship, protection, and support of archeological sites while reaching all parts of the interested public.

Archeologist's professional ethics

Archeologists have ethical responsibilities regarding the treatment of Native Americans and their cultural remains, professional research standards, dissemination of research, and resource management. As an established profession, archeology maintains ethical standards by which its members must adhere. Such standards ensure that archeologists maintain a high level of professionalism as they conduct research and share it with the public.

For your information

Click on the following links to access information about professional archeological organizations and their ethics and conduct codes:

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