• Double O Arch

    Arches

    National Park Utah

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Delicate Arch Viewpoint Inaccessible

    Wolfe Ranch and the hiking trail to Delicate Arch are open, but flood waters and mud have blocked the road to Delicate Arch Viewpoint.

  • Safety in Bear Country

    Black bears have been seen near Devils Garden Campground. Don't lure or feed them. Dispose of trash in designated receptacles; don't leave it in bags or other soft containers. Store food in vehicles or hard containers when not being prepared or consumed. More »

Bus Information

Every year, the park receives complaints about diesel engines running in parking lots. Your cooperation is needed to prevent a complete prohibition on idling engines, and to help make Arches a quieter, cleaner place. Bus drivers are prohibited from idling their engines in parking lots, with the following exceptions:

  • After long uphill grades, engines may be idled for up to 15 minutes in order to cool.
  • Engines may be left running to provide cooling or heating for disabled passengers who have difficulty in disembarking.

If you must idle your engine, please park away from other visitors and nearby viewpoints. If a small parking lot prevents this, drop off your passengers, leave the lot, and return at an appointed time to pick them up.

PLACES TO GO

The following areas are recommended as viewpoints and parking areas for buses:

  1. Park Avenue Viewpoint and Trailhead
  2. Courthouse Towers
  3. La Sal Mountains Viewpoint (also offers great views of Courthouse Towers)
  4. Balanced Rock
  5. Windows Trailhead
  6. Double Arch Trailhead (there is often more parking here than at Windows)
  7. Panorama Point
  8. Wolfe Ranch & Delicate Arch Trailhead
  9. Delicate Arch Viewpoint
  10. Salt Valley Overlook
  11. Devils Garden Picnic Areas and Trailhead

PLACES TO AVOID

Fiery Furnace Viewpoint
Many vehicles may be here for ranger-guided walks, leaving little space for larger vehicles.

Devils Garden Campground
Please drive through the campground only if your group is camping there; then, be aware of children playing, bicycles, and pedestrians.

The information contained here is to pass on to your passengers. Please read it carefully; their health, and the health of park resources, depends on it.

BIOLOGICAL SOIL CRUST

Much of this desert is covered by a living ground cover called biological soil crust. Composed primarily of algae, fungus, lichen, mosses and cyanobacteria, it holds desert soils together, retains moisture, slows erosion, and provides nutrients for plants and the animals that rely on them. Ask your guests to stay on trails to protect these crusts. At most locations, excellent photographs can be taken from the designated walkways. Please inform everyone of this critical issue.

WATER

The only two locations to get water in Arches National Park are at the visitor center and at Devils Garden. If your guests are planning to walk anywhere away from the bus, they should carry water with them. One quart (one liter) per person is recommended for a two-hour hike; more is needed for longer walks. Be certain that no one becomes dehydrated.

GARBAGE

Your guests may need a gentle reminder about this. They should put all garbage, including cigarette butts, in garbage cans.

HIKING

The only regulation on group size is for overnight hikers, but large groups should consider their impact on other visitors. Consider breaking a large group into smaller ones of no more than 10 people for hikes. Rangers can provide suggestions for easy drop-off and pick-up locations for larger groups.

Nobody plans on getting lost, but it does happen! All trails in Arches are marked with cairns (piles of rocks). Hikers should watch carefully to be certain that cairns are visible at all times. If they miss one, they should go back to the last one seen. If they become disoriented, they should seek a shady spot and wait for assistance. Wandering around only confuses searchers. The importance of carrying water is critical in this situation.

PARK RESOURCES

Everything in a national park is protected. Ask your guests to leave everything as they find it: rocks, plants, animals, archeological and historical artifacts. Help preserve Arches for future generations.

Did You Know?

Tadpole Shrimp

Naturally occurring sandstone basins called “potholes” collect rain water and wind-blown sediment, forming tiny ecosystems where a fascinating collection of plants and animals live. Tadpole shrimp, fairy shrimp and many insects can be found in potholes. More...