• Double O Arch

    Arches

    National Park Utah

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Scarlet Gilia (Skyrocket)

Ipomopsis aggregata

Ipomopsis aggregata

Synonym: Gilia aggregata

Family: Polemoniaceae - Phlox Family

Biennial or perennial herbs from taproots; 3.9” to 3.3' (1 to 10 dm) tall

Leaves: alternate and basal; simple; pinnatifid to sub-bipinnatifid; basal leaves 0.8” to 3.2” (2 to 8 cm) long

Flowers: 5 united lobed tubular scarlet petals with pointed flaring lobes; 5 lobed sepals; stamens usually 5; 1 pistil; flowers are 0.6” to 2” (1.5 to 5 cm) long

Pollinators: other species in this family are pollinated by insects (specifically bumblebees and beeflies) and hummingbirds

Fruits: capsule

Blooms in Arches National Park: May, June, July, August, September, October

Habitat in Arches National Park: riparian, desert shrub and pinyon-juniper communities

Location seen: upper and lower Courthouse wash, Wolfe Ranch

Other: The genus name, “Ipomopsis”, is from the Greek “ipo” which means “to strike" and “opsis” which means "appearance", so put together means “striking appearance”. The genus name, “Gilia”, honors Filippo Luigi Gilii (1756-1821), a scientist and astronomer. The species name, “aggregata”, means “clustered” and refers to the close arrangement of flowers.

Did You Know?

Landscape Arch

Landscape Arch is the longest arch in Arches National Park, measuring 306 feet from base to base. In 1991, a massive slab of rock fell from its underside, resulting in an even thinner ribbon of rock.