• Double O Arch

    Arches

    National Park Utah

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Inventory & Monitoring

photo: Scorpionweed (Phacelia crenulata)
Scorpionweed (Phacelia crenulata)
NPS Photo by Neal Herbert
 
To make sound management decisions, park managers need to know how and why natural systems change over time, and what amount of change is normal. National Park Service scientists monitor the “vital signs” of national park ecosystems—much like a physician measures a patient’s heartbeat and blood pressure to determine well-being and help diagnose problems.

The Northern Colorado Plateau Network (NCPN), which is part of the National Park Service’s Inventory & Monitoring Program, collects long-term data on a variety of natural resources. Ecologists then organize, analyze, and synthesize those data and provide the results to park staff. The information collected can provide early warning of ecosystem changes, allowing park managers to develop mitigation measures and reduce management costs.

At Arches National Park, the NCPN monitors climate, riparian and upland systems, invasive exotic plants, land surface phenology, landscape dynamics, landbirds, and water quality. To complete its work, the network collaborates with—and relies on help from—park staff as well as staff from other federal and state agencies, non-profit organizations, and universities. To learn more, visit the network’s web site or review Annual Reports of this and other research here.

Did You Know?

Pine Tree Arch

There are over 2,000 cataloged arches in Arches National Park. In order to be considered an arch, an opening must measure at least three feet (in any direction).