• Double O Arch

    Arches

    National Park Utah

Nakedstem Bahia (Basin Daisy)

Platyschkuhria integrifolia

Platyschkuhria integrifolia

Synonym: Bahia nudicaulis

Family: Asteraceae (A Utah Flora - Compositae) – Sunflower Family

Perennial aromatic herbs; 4.8” to 1.8' (12 to 55 cm) tall; there are at least 2 varieties of this species at Arches National Park: Platyschkuhria integrifolia var. desertorum (Desert Bahia) and Platyschkuhria integrifolia var. oblongifolia (San Juan Bahia).

Leaves: alternate; simple; 0.6” to 3.8” (1.5 to 9.5 cm) long, 0.2” to 1.6” (0.5 to 4 cm) wide

Flowers: 7 to 11 yellow ray flowers and yellow disk flowers; flower head appears to be a single flower, but is composed of several flowers (a composite). Rays 0.24” to 0.56” (6 to 14 mm) long; numerous disk flowers, perfect, 0.4” to 0.8” (1 to 2 cm) wide

Pollinators: other genera in this family are pollinated by insects

Fruits: achene – 1 seeded with hard shell

Blooms in Arches National Park: April, May, June

Habitat in Arches National Park: desert shrub and pinyon-juniper communities; mainly in saline substrates and in the Morrison Formation

Location seen: Delicate Arch road, Delicate Arch trail, outside Arches National Park in Long Canyon (below Dead Horse Point State Park)

Other: The genus name, “Platyschkuhria”, is derived from “platy” which is a prefix meaning “flat, broad or wide” and “Schkuhria” which honors German botanist Christian Schkur (1741-1811). The species name, "integrifolia", means “entire leaves, not toothed”. The genus name, “Bahia”, honors J. F. Bahi, a Barcelona botany professor. The species name, “nudicaulis”, means “with a bare stem”.

Platyschkuhria integrifolia var. desertorum is a Colorado Plateau endemic and occurs in Carbon, Duchesne, Emery, Garfield, Grand (type specimen was collected from Cisco), San Juan, Sevier, Uintah and Wayne Counties in Utah and Delta, Mesa and Montrose Counties in Colorado.

This family is the most advanced and complex of the dicots. The family is rich in oils and resins and is found in every part of the world, but is infrequent in the tropical rainforest. Aquatic or semi-aquatic species are also uncommon.

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