Systems Inventory and Hatteras DKQ

Dan Mizrach NO Comments

I'm writing this blog entry a little bit earlier in the pay period than the last one because next week I will out of the office, attending the Park Structural Fire Coordinator Conference in West Virginia.  

 

Recently, I've been continuing to take inventory of the Park's fire protection systems.  One of the questionable trends that I've noticed is that maintenance areas are pretty cluttered, and do not typically contain any fire protection other than portable fire extinguishers.  As some of these areas are going to be used for welding and cutting, this ties right in with the hot work policy that I have been developing.  As I continue to look around the Park, I will be submitting groups of work orders to correct some of these critical deficiencies.

For our analysis of a historical structure, I will be using the Double Keeper's Quarters down near Buxton, on Hatteras Island.  Originally built in 1854, the ex-living quarters are now used as a visitor center and exhibit hall for visitors who come to see the famous Hatteras Lighthouse.  The building was retrofitted with concealed sprinklers, but their placement is dubious and the stairs and exits are still the originals, so their code compliance will be interesting to look at.  The building is roughly an hour and fifteen minute drive from HQ.  It is hard to believe that the National Seashore extends another 30 miles from that down to Ocracoke, with a ferry ride thrown in for good measure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is an old photo of the DKQ found on the InsideNPS Historical Structures page, most likely taken pre-sprinkler system.  

In 1999, the lighthouse, Double Keeper's Quarters, Principle Keeper's Quarters and four other buildings were all moved a few hundred yards down the seashore in one piece.  They were put onto steel beams, placed on wheels, and rolled down to the new area.  This was done because of the growing threat of erosion.  The ocean has been slowly eroding away the beach, and the decision was made to make the move.  I only wish I had been there to see it, below is a picture I found on Google.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Credit: http://www.mytripolog.com/2009/05/buxton-home-of-cape-hatteras-part-2/

 

We got in our Hose Monster Flow Test Kit last week (below), so I am excited to get out and flow test some hydrants in the next few weeks.  It's starting to feel like summer here, so the hydrant flowing will be a welcome task.

Like I said above, next week I will be at the Fish and Wildlife Service's National Conservation Training Center in West Virginia.  Jim King, the SE Region's Structural Fire Manager, set up a conference for PSFCs to learn a little more about the various fire protection strategies that they will be employing.  From the rough schedule put out a few weeks ago, it looks like Matt and I may be helping with some of the instruction.  Though it is not the typical SFPE or NFPA conference that many FPEs may think of, it should be a good learning experience and will give me good exposure to how continuing education plays a critical role in the evolution of fire protection.  And the lodging/campus looks pretty nice too.

I'll be sure to post pictures in my next entry.

For our analysis of a historical structure, I will be using the Double Keeper's Quarters down near Buxton, on Hatteras Island.  Originally built in 1854, the ex-living quarters are now used as a visitor center and exhibit hall for visitors who come to see the famous Hatteras Lighthouse.  The building was retrofitted with concealed sprinklers, but their placement is dubious and the stairs and exits are still the originals, so their code compliance will be interesting to look at.  The building is roughly an hour and fifteen minute drive from HQ.  It is hard to believe that the National Seashore extends another 30 miles from that down to Ocracoke, with a ferry ride thrown in for good measure.

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