• Cannon and Cornfield at Dawn

    Antietam

    National Battlefield Maryland

horse riding policy

The riding of horses at Antietam National Battlefield is a permitted use based upon the following conditions:

1. Horse use is subject to the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 36, Section 2.16 (b), which prohibits "The use of horses or pack animals outside of trails, routes or areas designated for their use."

More specifically, Section 2.16 of Antietam National Battlefield's Park Compendium states as follows:

Groups of 10 or less riders are permitted to ride horses on park tour roads, Final Attack Trail, and on the Snavely’s Ford Trail. Riders are limited to two horses abreast on tour roads and single file on the Snavely’s Ford Trail. Groups of over 10 riders require a Special Use Permit issued by the Park Superintendent. Horses are prohibited on paved foot trails, parking areas or on agricultural permittees' pasture or cropland. All riders and/or drivers shall obey traffic laws in accordance with Maryland State Law."

2. To protect cultural resources jumping of stone walls and fences or riding faster than a canter is prohibited. Riders will be held responsible for damages to park resources.

3. Horse trailers are not to be parked in the visitor center parking lot. They are to be parked in the grassy area on the west side of Dunker Church Road, south of the Dunker Church.

4. The area where horse trailers are parked as well as any areas where horses have been tethered for any length of time must be clear of debris. Debris shall also be removed from park roadways.

5. Horses are not to be left unattended, to prevent interaction with and injury to other park visitors.

6. During inclement weather, the Snavely’s Ford Trail may be closed to visitor use.

7. Stables that charge a fee for trail rides must possess a “Commercial Use Authorization” approved by the Superintendent.

8. All accidents must be reported to a ranger or other park employee as soon as possible.

Did You Know?

President Lincoln

President Abraham Lincoln visited Antietam Battlefield two weeks after the battle and spent four days visiting General George McClellan, touring the battlefield and visiting the wounded of both sides.