• Cannon and Cornfield at Dawn

    Antietam

    National Battlefield Maryland

Antietam National Battlefield Accepts Donation of Medal Of Honor

Mr. Corey MacLeod of Greenville, South Carolina donates Congressional Medal of Honor to Antietam Superintendent John Howard
Mr. Corey MacLeod of Greenville, South Carolina donates the Congressional Medal of Honor awarded to his ancestor to Antietam Battlefield Superintendent John Howard
NPS photo

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News Release Date: June 10, 2008

Antietam National Battlefield Superintendent J.W. Howard announced that on May 9, 2008, Mr. Corey MacLeod of Greenville, South Carolina donated the Congressional Medal of Honor awarded to his ancestor Samuel Cole Wright to the National Battlefield. Sergeant Samuel C. Wright served with Company E of the 29th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for gallantry under fire near the Sunken Road (Bloody Lane).During this assault he was wounded in the knee, but refused to return to the rear and remained with his regiment.

The Congressional Medal of Honor Citation reads; “Private Samuel C. Wright voluntarily advanced under destructive fire and removed a fence which would have impeded a contemplated charge. “ In addition to the donation of the Congressional Medal of Honor, Mr. MacLeod also donated an original Unit History of the 29th Massachusetts Regiment belonging to Samuel Wright. This donation also included a partial piece of the Regimental Flag.

Superintendent Howard said “We at Antietam are humbled by the generosity of Mr. MacLeod and his family. This is a true gift to the people of the United States and these items will become a part of the Antietam Visit for millions of Americans in the future.”

 
Medal of Honor donated to Antietam Battlefield
Medal of Honor awarded to Private Samuel C. Wright, 29th Massachusetts Regiment, donated to Antietam Battlefield
NPS Photo

Did You Know?

Artillery at Antietam

Over 500 cannons participated in the Battle of Antietam, firing over 50,000 rounds of ammunition. The cannonade was so severe that Confederate artillery commander Colonel S.D. Lee described the battle as "artillery hell."