• Cannon and Cornfield at Dawn

    Antietam

    National Battlefield Maryland

Military Staff Ride

Antietam National Battlefield is one of the best-preserved Civil War battlefields in the country. A nine mile tour road allows for a self-guided tour of the battlefield. The park brochure provides an elementary overview of the battle, and there are several hundred War Department markers along the tour road that provide more detailed descriptions of the action during the battle. In addition, there is other helpful information on our web site. We also have available for mailing a military staff ride packet.

Staff rides to America's battlefields are a 100 year old tradition. In fact, the five original battlefield parks - Chickamauga, Antietam, Gettysburg, Shiloh and Vicksburg were created by the War Department in the 1890s just for that purpose. A park ranger may be available to give you a guided tour or staff ride of Antietam. Contact Park Ranger and Army War College graduate Keith Snyder at 301-432-5124 or e-mail at e-mail us to discuss your visit. Military groups who visit the park as part of their professional military education can qualify for a waiver of the entrance fee. In order for the park to waive the entrance fee for your group, you must submit a fee waiver request.

In order for the park to waive entrance fees for your group, you must submit a written request for a fee waiver on your organization's official letterhead in advance of your visit. This letter should include a written statement of educational purpose for your visit, the time and date of your visit, and the number of people in your group. Please send your fee waiver request to Mr. John Howard, Superintendent, Antietam National Battlefield, P.O. Box 158, Sharpsburg, MD 21782-0158. Or you may fax Mr. Howard at (301) 432-4590. Please be sure to include your fax number.

Did You Know?

The Maryland State Monument at Antietam

The Maryland State Monument is the only monument at Antietam dedicated to both sides. Marylanders fought for both the Union and the Confederacy. 20,000 people attended the dedication on May 30, 1900. President William McKinley, a veteran of the Battle of Antietam, was the keynote speaker